What happened Monday

That’s all for me for now. Thanks for reading along.

Here are the top stories from Monday afternoon:

  • Prosecution witness Donald Williams gave devastating testimony in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin over the death of George Floyd.
  • US transportation secretary Pete Buttigieg walked back his previous statements, and promised Biden’s new $3-$4 trillion infrastructure plan wouldn’t be financed with new gas or mileage taxes.
  • Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell was charged with sex trafficking of a minor, adding to other charges already filed against her.
  • The Biden administration is going big on wind energy, and is taking initial steps to approve a new huge wind farm off the coast of New Jersey.

Have a good night. See you next time!

Updated

The National Black Justice Coalition is pushing the PGA Tour to pull out of the upcoming Masters Tournament in Georgia to protest a new law in the state that significantly restricts voting rights, CNN reports.

Critics of the law, signed by Governor Brian Kemp last week, have characterized it as a way to limit civic participation from Black residents who helped turn the state blue, bolstering Biden’s victory and giving Democrats the final two senators needed to control both houses of Congress.

“The PGA Tour and Masters Tournament have both made commitments to help diversify golf and address racial inequities in this country — and we expect them to not only speak out against Georgia’s new racist voter suppression law — but to also take action,” the National Black Justice Coalition said in a statement.

From CNN:

The new law imposes new voter identification requirements for absentee ballots, empowers state officials to take over local elections boards, limits the use of ballot drop boxes and makes it a crime to approach voters in line to give them food and water. Voting rights groups have said the law would target the Black residents and other voters of color in the state.

The National Black Justice Coalition said professional golfers should refuse to play in Georgia until the law is repealed.

Updated

With opening day just days away, Major League Baseball has released a new set of guidelines for teams who achieve an 85% vaccination rate for players and staff, the Associated Press reports.

Masks will no longer be required in dugouts or bullpens and electronic tracing devices won’t be required. They will be able to eat and drink on flights, spend time with one another indoors and at hotels, can attend religious services and can resume relying on rideshare apps to get around.

The three-page memorandum sent to players Monday states that individuals are considered vaccinated two weeks after getting their second dose of either Pfizer or Moderna, or two weeks after their first dose of the single-dose vaccine from Johnson & Johnson.

The MLB still has a ways to go to vaccinate players, but the league is confident that more players and staff will get their shots when they return from spring training this week.

From AP:

Indians manager Terry Francona, who recently received his second vaccine, was pleased there weren’t many issues associated with the coronavirus during camp.

“You really haven’t heard a whole lot about it,” said Francona, who was aware of the memo but said he hadn’t read through it. “In the beginning, I think everybody had their hopes up that when we get here you could just go back to normal. It took a few days for everybody to realize that’s not the way it’s going to be.

“The rules are in place. We’ve told them, whether you agree or disagree, if you have a positive, you’re going to get sent home and probably take somebody with you.”

Updated

Responding to a CNN special that featured Dr Deborah Birx and Dr Anthony Fauci sharing insights from their struggles and obstacles they faced while trying to curb the spread of Covid-19 under the Trump administration, the former president released a scathing statement questioning their qualifications.

Former President Trump responds to recent interviews by Fauci and Birx. pic.twitter.com/mOZslzhU1v

— Mollie (@MZHemingway) March 29, 2021

In the rambling, insult-ridden statement, Trump called the doctors “two self-promoters trying to reinvent history” and gave himself all the credit for the vaccine development.

The former president derided Fauci for his pitch at a Washington Nationals game last year, and called him the “king of ‘flip-flops”, because he changed course as medical experts learned more about the novel virus.

Dr. Fauci to CNN on Trump and COVID: "The thing that hit me like a punch to the chest was then all of a sudden he got up and said, 'Liberate Virginia, Liberate Michigan.' And I said to myself, 'Oh my goodness. What is going on here?'"

— Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) March 29, 2021

He called Birx a “proven liar with very little credibility left” and said he only kept the two on because they had long track records of public service, adding that “they are like a bad habit!”

The tirade was in direct response to a CNN special that aired Sunday, featuring six US health officials who spoke out about their experiences trying to contain the spread while navigating both a lack of preparation and an uncooperative president.

“First, I wanted to make sure that we stopped saying that the risk to Americans was low,” Birx said on the program. “I could see the avalanche coming, and I could see that we were not prepared, and I thought I could do something.”

Meanwhile, the Biden administration announced today that it will launch a new taskforce to investigate how Trump’s team may have undermined efforts to stop Covid by distorting or denying science, NBC reports.

In a letter to federal agencies, obtained by NBC News, the White House said the task force’s mandate would include identifying whether current policies effectively “prevent improper political interference in the conduct of scientific research” and “prevent the suppression or distortion of scientific or technological findings.”

Updated

The Biden administration is expected to approve a big new wind farm off the New Jersey coast, the Associated Press reports, as part of a plan to provide up to 10 million homes across the US with alternative energy by 2030.

Biden “believes we have an enormous opportunity in front of us to not only address the threats of climate change, but use it as a chance to create millions of good-paying, union jobs that will fuel America’s economic recovery″, White House climate adviser Gina McCarthy told the AP. “Nowhere is the scale of that opportunity clearer than for offshore wind.″

Projected to be in operation by 2024, the wind farm is projected produce 1,100 megawatts annually — enough to power half a million homes.

The Biden administration announced today a sweeping effort to bolster offshore wind energy projects in the US to jumpstart a “clean energy revolution” and create thousands of jobs.

— Kate Sullivan (@KateSullivanDC) March 29, 2021

Biden’s plan to double offshore wind production over the next decade comes after years of resistance to the energy source from the Trump administration. It also marks a shift in the US, which has lagged behind European nations in embracing wind as an energy source.

The White House claims that meeting its target would come with the added bonus of 44,000 offshore wind jobs and another 33,000 jobs created in other support industries.

From AP:

Wind developers are poised to create tens of thousands of jobs and generate more than $100 billion in new investment by 2030, “but the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management must first open the door to new leasing,″ said Erik Milito, president of the National Ocean Industries Association.

Not everyone is cheering the rise of offshore wind. Fishing groups from Maine to Florida have expressed fear that large offshore wind projects could render huge swaths of the ocean off-limits to their catch.

Updated

New charges have been filed against Ghislaine Maxwell, Jeffrey Epstein’s former associate, that now include sex trafficking of a minor, the New York Times reports.

Filed by federal prosecutors today, the new indictment builds on charges filed previously against Maxwell and allege that she recruited an underage girl to give massages that led to sexual acts, in exchange for cash.

Maxwell, who been awaiting trail from jail after her arrest last July, has pleased not guilty to charges filed previously by prosecutors.

NEW: Federal prosecutors in New York have hit Ghislaine Maxwell with a superseding indictment which includes two new charges all linked to a 4th victim they say they are now including in the case against her, court documents show.

The alleged conduct occurred from 2001 to 2004.

— Tom Winter (@Tom_Winter) March 29, 2021

From The New York Times:

The new indictment comes almost nine months after Ms. Maxwell, 59, once a fixture on New York’s social scene, was arrested in New Hampshire on charges she had lured underage girls — one as young as 14 — into Mr. Epstein’s orbit, and contributed to his abuse of them.

The new indictment issued on Monday cites an additional 14-year-old girl who is identified only as Minor Victim-4.

Epstein, who was also awaiting trial, was found dead in his cell in New York in August 2019.

Updated

Buttigieg rules out a new gas tax to pay for infrastructure plan

The Biden administration is hoping to assuage concerns that a new gas tax might be coming to pay for the president’s sweeping infrastructure plan.

The US transportation secretary, Pete Buttigieg, said Monday that the plan won’t rely on a new gas tax or a mileage tax. Speaking to Jake Tapper on CNN’s The Lead he walked back comments he made to CNBC last friday, which indicated the taxes might still be on the table.

A mileage-based tax shows a lot of promise, @SecretaryPete says about funding President Biden's infrastructure package. Revenue generation will most likely come from several different sources. "We've got to think big; it's got to be transformative." https://t.co/QY1JvWXXOA pic.twitter.com/4R2CD6KaZV

— CNBC (@CNBC) March 26, 2021

The two-pronged proposal, which centers on both infrastructure and jobs, is expected to cost up to $4tn, according to administration officials.

“The president has a plan to fix our infrastructure and a plan to pay for it,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters Monday. “But we are also open to having a discussion, and we certainly expect to have a discussion with members of Congress moving forward.”

The White House plan will also call for increasing the corporate tax rate 7 points to 28%, ending subsidies for fossil fuels and enforcing US tax rates for multinational corporations, according to CNN.

CNN reports:

Internal debates on how much of the proposal to pay for have been ongoing for several weeks, with White House officials keenly aware of potential inflationary risks, officials said. Psaki told reporters the proposal laid out on Wednesday would include mechanisms to finance the entirety of the package over time.

That proposal is expected to include significant investments to repair roads, bridges and railways, as well as other key elements of an aging and, in some places, dilapidated US core infrastructure system. It will also include a major focus on domestic manufacturing and significant funds for school and child care infrastructure.

Updated

Space X is facing congressional scrutiny after regulators found the company’s commercial space launch may have violated US safety requirements and licensing, Reuters reports.

The December launch of Starship SN8 was flagged by Federal Aviation Administration officials in February for moving forward without assurances that risks from “far field blast overpressure” — a type of shockwave that can result from impact explosions — were adequately assessed.

The FAA approved the company’s plan to correct the issue, but the House transportation and infrastructure committee chairman, Peter DeFazio, and Representative Rick Larsen issued a letter Thursday citing concerns.

“Given the high-risk nature of the industry, we are disappointed that the FAA declined to conduct an independent review of the event and, to the best of our knowledge, has not pursued any form of enforcement action,” they wrote.

Meanwhile, SpaceX is preparing for its next launch, which was scheduled for today but postponed after an inspector was unable to be on site.

From a source: SpaceX initially told the inspector, who had been in TX all week waiting for launch, that they weren't launching on Monday, so the inspector flew home. Then SpaceX changed plans late last night saying they're aiming for Monday, while the inspector was in Florida. https://t.co/CJ1rNkfSAC

— Joey Roulette (@joroulette) March 29, 2021

Updated

'Faded away like a fish in a bag' – witness in Chauvin trial

Blistering eyewitness testimony happening now in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin over the death of George Floyd.

Prosecution witness Donald Williams, 33, a mixed martial arts fighter, was close to the back of the police vehicle next to which, on 25 May 2020, now-former police officer Derek Chauvin had Floyd pinned to the concrete by his neck.

Williams told the court that he could hear and see Floyd in distress and his martial arts experience indicated to him that Chauvin was choking out Floyd as he kneeled on his neck.

The jury, and the public watching in court or around the world by livestream, was shown some devastating clips of Chauvin allegedly “shimmying” in what Williams said was a martial arts move, altering his position very slightly so that it put more pressure on – as a fighter does when they have someone in a hold.

Williams heard Floyd talking about how much pain he was in, his distress as he said he couldn’t breathe, apologized to the officers and begged for his life.

“The more that the knee was on his neck, and the shimmying going on, the more you see him [Floyd] slowly fade away. His eyes rolled to the back of his head,” Williams said.

He described Floyd dying “like a fish in a bag” and said he saw “blood coming out of his nose”, adding “he had no life in him any more.”

Williams described the knee-position as a dangerous “blood choke” intended to cut Floyd’s airway. Williams has previously been heard but unseen shouting angrily at the police from the sidewalk, calling Chauvin a “bum” and accusing him of enjoying what he was doing, as Floyd suffers and begs.

On convenience, God works in his ways. For Donald Williams to go to the store and witness George Floyd being murdered with a move he's well informed of from his MMA fighting. That's supposed to happen. Testimony: Derek Chauvin looked at him when he said that's a Blood Choke move. pic.twitter.com/zFqdD43CDK

— whudat (@whudat) March 29, 2021

Updated

By the end of this work-week, all adults – and some teens – will be eligible to get a Covid vaccine in Colorado, Associated Press reports.

Governor Jared Polis announced the expansion of the vaccine program onMonday, adding that everyone in the state will be able to get a dose by mid to late May. Over 1 million Coloradans have already been fully vaccinated.

COVID-19 VACCINE UPDATE!

Starting Friday, April 2, all Coloradans 16 and up will be eligible to receive the Pfizer vaccine and those 18 and up will be eligible for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

This is a huge step towards Building Back Stronger here in Colorado. pic.twitter.com/w9uicase56

— Governor Jared Polis (@GovofCO) March 29, 2021

“Every day we’re getting closer to ending the pandemic, but it’s not over yet,” Polis said during a news conference.

Across the US, roughly 95 million people have gotten at least one shot, and close to 53 million have been fully vaccinated, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But even as new daily records for numbers of vaccines administered continue to be set, and states continue to ramp up their rates, public health officials have called for continued vigilance. Covid cases are again creeping up in some areas of the country.

Biden called on states to reinstate mask mandates on Monday, saying that “reckless behavior” was threatening progress made in containing the pandemic.

Updated

Hello everyone! I am Gabrielle Canon, signing on to take you through the news for the next few hours.

First up — Donald Trump jumped on an unusual opportunity to share his feelings about the state of affairs since he’s left office, taking over the microphone during a wedding being held at his Mar-a-Lago resort over the weekend,.

Celebrity tabloid site TMZ first released the video of the former-president’s rambling toast, where he aired complaints about Biden’s policies and rehashed fabricated accusations of election fraud, before congratulating the happy couple.

The Guardian’s Martin Pengelly has the story:

“Y’know,” the tuxedoed former president began, standing in front of a waiting band, “I just got, I turned off the news, I get all these flash reports, and they’re telling me about the border, they’re telling me about China, they’re telling me about Iran – how’re we doing with Iran, how do you like that?”

Read the rest of the story here:

Today so far

That’s it from me today. My west coast colleague Gabrielle Canon will take over the blog for the next few hours.

Here’s where the day stands so far:

  • The trial of Derek Chauvin in connection to the killing of George Floyd started in Minneapolis. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, is facing charges of murder in the second and third degree and manslaughter.
  • Prosecutors played the video showing the final moments of Floyd’s life. In the video, Chauvin kneels on Floyd’s neck as Floyd repeatedly says, “I can’t breathe.” Bystanders are also heard urging Chauvin to stop kneeling on Floyd’s neck for several minutes.
  • Joe Biden announced that 90% of American adults will be eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine by April 19. By that date, 90% of Americans will live within five miles of a vaccination site, the president said. Biden also announced his administration is expanding its pharmacy vaccine program and spending nearly $100 million to vaccinate vulnerable communities.
  • The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expressed a feeling of “impending doom” as coronavirus cases rise in the US. During the White House coronavirus response team’s briefing today, Dr Rochelle Walensky said, “We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are and so much reason for hope, but right now I’m scared.” The CDC director urged Americans to continue wearing masks and socially distancing to limit the spread of coronavirus as vaccinations ramp up. Biden echoed Walensky’s concerns and asked states to reinstate mask mandates if they have rescinded them.
  • A CDC study showed the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were highly effective at preventing coronavirus infections in real-world conditions. According to the study, the risk of infection was reduced by 90% two weeks after study participants received the second dose of a vaccine.

Gabrielle will have more coming up, so stay tuned.

Updated

Protesters outside the Minneapolis court house where former police officer Derek Chauvin is on trial for the murder of George Floyd today were acutely aware of the significance of the case and well as the precariousness of the outcome.

Jason Brown, 40, a vice president of a tech company and the president of Minnesota’s Arc of Justice advocacy group, who is Black, told the Guardian: “I wish for once America would stand up for us. ... If [Chauvin] meant to do this or if he didn’t mean to, it happened.”

Brown is concerned that the jury, which is majority white, may not convict.

“The jury? I don’t think a Black man could get fair justice in America anywhere,” he said.

People are braced for the defense to try to tear down Floyd’s character and conduct on the day.

“[Floyd is] a Black man who’s not really on trial - but he is on trial. He died, but he’s on trial,” Brown said.

The city has emphasized that peaceful protest is encouraged, despite the heavily-protected court building and the deployment of National Guard troops.

But there is no doubt that if Chauvin is acquitted or even if convicted on the least serious charge, manslaughter, resulting protests could escalate and spin out of control.

“If they don’t get it right, we will get it right. The younger generations don’t have patience for nonsense,” Brown said.

Another protester, who identified only by her artistic moniker of Aesthetic Ash, said she left her home in California last May and has been participating in protests across the country since.

“I’m here to make sure the community knows that people genuinely care about George Floyd, they care about Breonna Taylor and they care about all the whose lives have been stolen too early,” she said.

Minnesota has only one previous recorded murder conviction of a police officer in the course of his duty - an officer of color.

Joe Biden is scheduled to deliver a speech on his proposed infrastructure package on Wednesday in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the president will speak in the same union hall where he campaigned for Democratic congressional candidate Conor Lamb in a 2018 special election.

Lamb won that special election and has since won two re-election races to remain in the House of Representatives.

Joe Biden is planning to launch his infrastructure pitch in the same Western PA union hall where he campaigned for Conor Lamb in the 2018 special election

— Jonathan Tamari (@JonathanTamari) March 29, 2021

Updated

CDC study shows Pfizer and Moderna vaccines highly effective in preventing Covid infections

In case you missed it: a new CDC study provided “strong evidence” that the two mRNA vaccines approved for use in the US, produced by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, are highly effective in preventing infections in what the agency called “real-world conditions” among healthcare personnel, first-responders and essential workers.

“This study shows that our national vaccination efforts are working,” said Dr Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“These findings should offer hope to the millions of Americans receiving Covid-19 vaccines each day and to those who will have the opportunity to roll up their sleeves and get vaccinated in the weeks ahead.”

Nonetheless, many experts fear a fourth wave of Covid-19 in the US as variants of the deadly virus continue to circulate in numerous states, many of which have almost fully reopened, and Americans prepare for the summer travel season.

Despite more than 2.5m vaccinations being administered per day and a shrinking death toll, Walensky believes a fourth wave is imminent.

“I’m going to lose the script, and I’m going to reflect on the recurring feeling I have of impending doom,” she said. “We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are, and so much reason for hope. But right now I’m scared.”

Walensky’s concern appears to be backed up by statistics. The US recently passed 30m cases of Covid-19, according to Johns Hopkins University, and the seven-day average of hospital admissions has risen to 4,800, up 200.

The daily average of new cases has also risen, by 10% in a week, to about 70,000, far higher than the 40,000 to 50,000 daily cases of a few weeks ago.

In Michigan, the Associated Press reports, a judge has ordered three men to stand trial regarding a foiled plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer over her coronavirus restrictions.

Jackson county district court Judge Michael Klaeren ruled there was enough evidence and bound over Paul Bellar, Joe Morrison and Pete Musico to circuit court to stand trial.

Arguments were heard by Klaeren about whether the men should face trial following three days of testimony. They are accused of aiding six other men charged in federal court with conspiring to kidnap Whitmer. Five more people are also charged in state courts.

The FBI in October said it broke up a plot to kidnap Whitmer by anti-government extremists upset over her coronavirus restrictions.

Klareen said there was enough evidence for trial on charges of providing material support for terrorist acts, gang membership and using a firearm during a felony. The judge dismissed a charge of threat of terrorism against Musico and Morrison. Bellar did not face that charge.

Here’s some further reading…

As he walked away from the podium, a reporter asked Joe Biden if he believed some states should pause their reopening efforts because of the rise in coronavirus cases across the US.

“Yes,” the president replied.

REPORTER: Do you believe some states should pause their reopening efforts?

BIDEN: Yes pic.twitter.com/64ggT1WuYG

— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) March 29, 2021

A number of states have relaxed some of their coronavirus-related restrictions in recent weeks, as vaccinations have increased.

But the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr Rochelle Walensky, warned of “impending doom” in connection to the recent rise in cases.

“We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are, and so much reason for hope,” Walensky said during this morning’s briefing from the White House coronavirus response team. “But right now I’m scared.”

Joe Biden confirmed that 90% of American adults will be eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine by April 19. By that date, 90% of Americans will also live within five miles of a vaccination site.

Biden noted that the final 10% of American adults will be eligible to receive the vaccine by May 1, as he previously announced.

I’m proud to announce that three weeks from today, 90% of adults will be eligible to get vaccinated — and 90% of Americans will live within 5 miles of a place to get a shot.

— President Biden (@POTUS) March 29, 2021

The president also announced his administration is expanding its pharmacy vaccination program to 20,000 more local pharmacies, and the federal government is investing nearly $100 million to get vulnerable communities vaccinated.

“We still are in a war with this deadly virus, and we’re bolstering our defense, but this war is far from won,” Biden said.

The president concluded his comments by asking Americans to continue to wear masks, socially distance and wash their hands to limit the spread of the virus.

Updated

Biden calls on states to reinstate mask mandates as coronavirus cases rise

Joe Biden is now speaking at the White House to deliver an update on the distribution of coronavirus vaccines in the US.

The president noted the country has administered a record number of shots in recent days, with 10 million doses being delivered over the three days of this past weekend.

“That would have been inconceivable in January,” Biden said. “My fellow Americans, look at what we have done over the past 10 weeks.”

But Biden emphasized that the country’s work to get the virus under control is far from over. Echoing comments from the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Biden asked Americans to continue wearing masks and socially distancing to limit the spread of coronavirus.

At the White House coronavirus response team’s briefing this morning, the CDC director, Dr Rochelle Walensky, noted coronavirus cases have been on the rise in recent days.

“We’re giving up hard-fought, hard-won gains,” Biden said.

The president asked states that have rescinded their mask mandates to reinstate those public health orders.

“Mask up, mask up. It’s your patriotic duty,” Biden said. “It’s the only way we’ll get back to normal.”

Biden to announce 90% of US adults will be vaccine eligible by April 19, White House confirms

The White House has confirmed that Joe Biden will announce today that 90% of American adults will be eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine by April 19.

By that date, 90% of Americans will also have a vaccination site within five miles of where they live, the White House said in a new statement.

According to the statement, Biden will announce his administration is expanding the federal pharmacy vaccination program to 20,000 more local pharmacies across the US.

The president will also announce nearly $100 million in funding to help vaccinate vulnerable and at-risk communities, as well as Americans with disabilities.

Finally, Biden will announce his administration is going to establish a dozen more federally-run mass vaccination sites across the country. The White House said earlier today that two such sites will be set up in Gary, Indiana, and St Louis, Missouri.

Biden is expected to start speaking any moment, so stay tuned.

Georgia sued again over elections law

Georgia now faces two federal lawsuits over its sweeping new election law, both alleging state Republicans designed the measure to discriminate against Black and other minority voters.

A suit filed on Sunday by a coalition of civil rights groups, including the state chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda, says the law is intentionally discriminatory and violates the 14th and 15th amendments of the constitution as well as the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The measure, signed into law on Thursday by Governor Brian Kemp, a Republican, implements a number of changes to Georgia election law. It requires voters to show identification information both when they request and return a mail-in ballot. It also shortens the period in which voters can vote by mail, prohibits providing food and water to voters in line at the polls, limits the availability of absentee ballot drop boxes, requires county boards of elections to hear voter challenges within 10 days, and creates a pathway for Republicans in the legislature to meddle in local elections,

The law “is the culmination of a concerted effort to suppress the participation of Black voters and other voters of color by the Republican state senate, state house and governor,” lawyers representing the groups wrote.

“Unable to stem the tide of these demographic changes or change the voting patterns of voters of color, these officials have resorted to attempting to suppress the vote of Black voters and other voters of color in order to maintain the tenuous hold that the Republican party has in Georgia.”

The complaint is the second lawsuit filed challenging the provisions. On Thursday, almost immediately after Kemp signed the measure, the New Georgia Project and Black Voters Matter, two civic action groups, filed their own suit challenging the law.

Joe Biden said on Friday that the US justice department, charged with enforcing the Voting Rights Act, was also “taking a look at the Georgia measure”. The department did not file any major voting rights cases under Donald Trump.

Several more lawsuits challenging the Georgia law are expected. The suits will likely face an uphill battle among an increasingly conservative federal judiciary, especially at the appellate level that has looked skeptically on claims of voting discrimination in voting recently.

Biden to announce big vaccines boost – reports

Shortly after CDC director Rochelle Walensky spoke about her “sense of doom” about rising Covid case numbers, the White House trailed some altogether more optimistic words to come from Joe Biden this afternoon.

As Bloomberg News reports it:

President Joe Biden plans to announce that 90% of US adults will be eligible to get a Covid-19 vaccine in three weeks, and that his administration will more than double the number of pharmacies where shots are available, officials familiar with the matter said.

Biden will make the announcement on Monday afternoon at the White House, marking 19 April as a new milestone in the vaccination effort. He’ll also say that nearly all US adults will be able to get a shot within five miles of their homes, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Of course, the two lines of comment are not remotely mutually exclusive. Great strides are indeed being made in vaccinations across the US, with New York ready to vaccinate everyone over 30 and soon all adults, said Andrew Cuomo also on Monday, but case numbers are also rising, virus variants are dangerous and many states are pursuing reopening policies dangerously fast.

Here’s our current news lead, leading on Walensky’s remarks but “wrapping”, as they in the news business, other developments too:

Today so far

The White House press briefing has now concluded. Here’s where the day stands so far:

  • The trial of Derek Chauvin in connection to the killing of George Floyd started in Minneapolis. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, is facing charges of murder in the second and third degree and manslaughter.
  • Prosecutors played the video showing the final moments of Floyd’s life. In the video, Chauvin kneels on Floyd’s neck as Floyd can be heard repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe.” Bystanders are also heard urging Chauvin to stop kneeling on Floyd’s neck for several minutes.
  • The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expressed a feeling of “impending doom” as coronavirus cases rise in the US. During the White House coronavirus response team’s briefing today, Dr Rochelle Walensky said, “We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are and so much reason for hope, but right now I’m scared.” The CDC director urged Americans to continue wearing masks and socially distancing to limit the spread of coronavirus as vaccinations ramp up.

The blog will have more coming up, so stay tuned.

Jen Psaki said Joe Biden will also explain how he intends to pay for his infrastructure package when he lays out the proposal. Psaki added that the president is open to ideas from members of Congress on how to pay for the legislation.

Republicans have already indicated they will not support any plan that includes rolling back some of the tax cuts that Donald Trump signed into law.

The president is scheduled to deliver a speech on his infrastructure package in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday. The White House press secretary noted at the start of her briefing that Biden launched his presidential campaign in Pittsburgh two years ago.

Biden 'certainly will be watching closely' as Floyd trial unfolds, White House says

Jen Psaki was asked whether Joe Biden will be watching Derek Chauvin’s trial, as the former Minneapolis police officer faces murder charges in connection to the killing of George Floyd.

“He certainly will be watching closely, as Americans across the country will be watching,” the White House press secretary said. “He will certainly be provided updates.”

Psaki emphasized the need to allow the legal system some time to determine if Chauvin is guilty of murder in the second and third degree in connection to the killing of Floyd.

Asked whether the president would speak to the Floyd family as the trial unfolds, Psaki said she did not have any information of that front, but she noted that Biden spoke to Floyd’s family members last spring and was “impressed by their courage”.

The press secretary argued the trial underscored the need for Congress to address racial injustices in the US.

The House passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act earlier this month, but it’s unclear whether it can pass the evenly divided Senate.

The White House press secretary, Jen Psaki, is now holding her daily briefing with reporters.

Psaki opened the briefing by noting that Joe Biden will travel to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday to lay out his infrastructure package.

The press secretary also drew attention to this morning’s announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that it is extending its pandemic-related eviction moratorium until June 30.

Psaki then noted that the Biden administration announced plans today to expand offshore wind energy projects in order to create jobs and decrease the country’s reliance on fossil fuels.

Derrick Johnson, the president of the NAACP, said of Derek Chauvin’s trial in connection to the killing of George Floyd, “The right to breathe is on trial.”

The right to breathe is on trial.

— Derrick Johnson (@DerrickNAACP) March 29, 2021

Over at the trial, prosecutor Matthew Frank is currently questioning Jena Scurry, a 911 dispatcher in Minneapolis. Scurry has provided some background information on her job and responsibilities responding to police requests.

Progressive congresswoman Cori Bush criticized the defense lawyers of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for trying to put the focus on George Floyd’s character rather than their client’s actions.

“Derek Chauvin is on trial. America is on trial. Our criminal-legal system is on trial. George Floyd is not on trial,” Bush, a Democrat of Missouri, said in a tweet.

Derek Chauvin is on trial.
America is on trial.
Our criminal-legal system is on trial.

George Floyd is not on trial.

— Cori Bush (@CoriBush) March 29, 2021

CDC director warns of 'impending doom' as coronavirus cases rise

This is Joan Greve in Washington, taking over for Joanna Walters.

The White House coronavirus response team held a briefing this morning, and the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a dire warning about the recent rise in coronavirus cases in the US.

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky goes off script with an emotional plea to the public about an “impending doom” following rise in COVID cases:

“Right now, I’m scared.” pic.twitter.com/UKjrRhr7He

— The Recount (@therecount) March 29, 2021

Dr Rochelle Walensky deviated from her prepared remarks for the briefing to reflect on the “recurring feeling I have of impending doom”.

“We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are and so much reason for hope, but right now I’m scared,” Walensky said, as her voice wavered.

“I’m speaking today not necessarily as your CDC director, and not only as your CDC director, but as a wife, as a mother, as a daughter to ask you to just please hold on a little while longer,” the CDC director added.

Asked later in the briefing to explain why she is concerned, Walensky noted that new coronavirus cases in the US had recently stagnated around 40,000 to 50,000 a day. But the number of new cases has recently ticked upward to around 70,000 a day. Coronavirus hospitalizations and deaths are also on the rise in the US.

Walensky urged Americans to continue taking every possible precaution to limit the spread of the virus as states work to get more residents vaccinated.

According to Johns Hopkins University, 549,364 Americans have now died of coronavirus.

Defense begins its opening in Chauvin trial

The principle defense lawyer Eric Nelson is now making his opening argument.

Prosecutor Jerry Blackwell made the opening argument for the state for a little over an hour, including the devastating video showing George Floyd’s death.

Nelson is talking from behind a plexiglas screen. Derek Chauvin is sitting to his left, with a face mask.

Nelson is already talking about how Floyd was under the influence of drugs on 25 May 2020, when he went in to Cup Foods corner store in southern Minneapolis and, allegedly, tried to buy a packet of cigarettes with a fake $20 bill.

Updated

In the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, prosecutor Jerry Blackwell notes that later in the trial, the jury will hear from the city’s police chief, Medaria Arradondo.

Blackwell said that Arradondo will say that the conduct of Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd last May was “not consistent” with Minneapolis Police Department training or protocol.

“He will tell you it’s excessive force,” Blackwell said.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo at a press conference last month.
Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo at a press conference last month. Photograph: Richard Tsong-Taatarii/AP

Derek Chauvin is charged with murder in the second and third degree and with manslaughter. He was fired after Floyd’s killing.

Defense lawyer Eric Nelson (left) and defendant Derek Chauvin (right) in court in Minneapolis.
Defense lawyer Eric Nelson (left) and defendant Derek Chauvin (right) in court in Minneapolis. Photograph: AP

George Floyd’s family along with family attorneys and civil rights cctivist Al Sharpton held a press conference in front of the courthouse where ex-officer Derek Chauvin is on trial charged with murdering George Floyd.

“Derek Chauvin is in the courtroom but America is on trial,” Sharpton said to the crowd.

The family, led by Sharpton, took a knee beginning at 8.46am for eight minutes and 46 seconds to symbolize the actions taken by Chauvin which resulted in Floyd’s death.

Downtown city buildings in Minneapolis blocked out the sun as cool winds swirled through the small crowd of protesters. Despite the small size, protesters worked hard to make their voices heard outside of the Hennepin Government Center in downtown Minneapolis, the location of the heavily-barricaded court house.

One protesters held a sign that read, “Chauvin can you breathe?”

Others read: “Minneapolis will never forget George Floyd,” and “Mr George Floyd is not in trial, Derek Chauvin is.”

Demonstrators chanted their demands for justice.

Mikayla McKasy, a Black, 23-year-old actor, told the Guardian: “It’s time for actual judicial change. What has happened since we marched last year? What has changed? Nothing.”

Mckasy added: “Cops need to be accountable for their actions...The fact that we let a cop with 19 [complaints] against him still walk the streets is unfathomable.”

Chauvin had a history of complaints against him from the public, and a track record of restraining people using his knee.

Updated

Members of the public, lawyers, activists and members of George Floyd’s family gathered early this morning outside the heavily-barricaded court house.

Our correspondent Amudalat Ajasa was there and took some video as the central group kneeled.

Civil rights activist Rev Al Sharpton notes at the two minute-mark of them taking a knee that they are only a short way into the time that Chauvin crushed Floyd.

BREAKING NEWS: Floyd’s family, attorneys and Civil Rights Activist Al Sharpton have entered the courthouse following a press conference in front of Minneapolis’ Hennepin County Government Center as the first day of the trial is underway. #DerekChauvinTrial #GeorgeFloyd pic.twitter.com/O5asJtxcoP

— Amudalat Ajasa (@AmudalatAjasa) March 29, 2021

'Please I can't breathe': prosecutors play video

Prosecutors are now playing the excruciating and shocking video of now-former officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck as Floyd pleads for his life.

Floyd can be heard roaring in pain and anguish, crying out, as Chauvin adjusts his position to ensure he is firmly pinned under his knee.

Bystanders can be heard saying: “You have got him down, let him breathe”, “His nose is bleeding” and “How long y’all going to hold him down?”

Floyd grunts: “I can’t breathe.”

A bystander says of and to Chauvin: “He is enjoying this. You are enjoying this, you fucking bum ... he is not even resisting arrest, you are stopping his breathing, you think that’s cool?”

The bystander man off camera can be heard saying that the police will not even look him in the eye.

It’s always been noticeable that the public does not dare to physically intervene, as another police officer, armed, keeps pleading bystanders at bay.

Chauvin has his hand in his pants pocket and his sunglasses on his head as he continues to press his knee into Floyd’s neck.

The prosecution was always going to center its case on the devastating video. They presented it in less than 45 minutes after beginning opening arguments.

A woman can be heard saying, after Floyd has fallen silent, “Have they killed him?”

Updated

Prosecutor Blackwell asked: “What was this all about in the first place? It was all about a counterfeit $20 bill at a convenience store.”

He’s referring to the alleged offense that Minneapolis police were arresting George Floyd for on 25 May 2020, when they forced him to the ground, restraining him until, ultimately, Floyd, 46, died.

Blackwell said: “They could have written him a ticket. Even if he did it on purpose it’s a minor offense, a misdemeanor.”

The police were originally called on Floyd for allegedly trying to spend a fake bill at Cup Foods store at the junction of 38th St and Chicago Avenue in a southern neighborhood of Minneapolis.

This area has become a focal point of protests and a semi-formal shrine known as George Floyd Square.

The future of the square is in the balance. Here’s our latest report:

Updated

'He betrayed this badge': prosecutor

Prosecutor Jerry Blackwell has begun his opening argument in the trial of white former police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd.

Blackwell opens by showing the jury a Minneapolis police badge and some of the essence of the rules officers take an oath to follow, namely that they will “never employ unnecessary force or violence” against the public and uphold “the sanctity of life”.

Chauvin “betrayed this badge,” Blackwell said, adding, in language that, surely not unintentionally, evokes the Black Lives Matter movement.

“All of this matters,” he said.

Jerry Blackwell speaking earlier this month at the Hennepin county courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Jerry Blackwell speaking earlier this month at the Hennepin county courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photograph: AP

It’s relevant, as the defense is expected to argue that Chauvin was following his training when he restrained Floyd.

A picture then flashes up for the jury (and the media and public watching via live stream), an all-too familiar image of Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck as the Black man is prone on the street and Chauvin, Blackwell said, “was grinding and crushing him until the very breath ... was squeezed out of him.”

He points out that Floyd was not only unarmed but was in handcuffs and was “completely in control of the police” and he was defenseless. And yet Chauvin remained in position for more than nine minutes as Floyd said 27 times, with increasing difficulty, that he could not breathe.

Blackwell apologized to the jury that he was addressing them from behind plexiglass, which is ubiquitous in the court room, to help prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Updated

Meanwhile, we’ll keep you updated on significant US political news occurring elsewhere today, from Washington to ... anywhere but Washington.

In Atlanta, Georgia, this morning, state representative Park Cannon came back to the Capitol after the staggering spectacle last week of her being arrested as she knocked on the door of Governor Brian Kemp while he was signing new voter suppression legislation (he calls it voter expansion...)

HAPPENING NOW: Rep. Park Cannon returns to the Capitol escorted by Martin Luther King, III and a group of silent protesters against voter suppression pic.twitter.com/qtAPzP7XTM

— Hayley Mason (@HayleyMasonTV) March 29, 2021

She was escorted this morning by Martin Luther King III, a descendent of the assassinated civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr, and silent protesters.

Kemp signed the legislation last week seemingly very deliberately flanked by six white men and beneath an antebellum-style painting of a plantation in the time of slavery, which sparked outrage.

Jewel Wicker, in Atlanta, reported on that topic last week.

Georgia US Senator Raphael Warnock yesterday said that the US Congress must pass voting rights legislation without fail, to counter efforts that are going on in many Republican-controlled state legislatures, including Georgia, to restrict voting in a way that impacts Black and minority communities that tend to vote Democratic .

Warnock delivered a challenge to Joe Biden to prioritize the fight against voter suppression, telling the US president: “We have to pass voting rights no matter what.”

Updated

Judge Peter Cahill is swearing in the jury in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd.

He’s instructing the jury now. He is wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

The judge’s opening remark to the jury was: “You will be the judges of the facts and I will be the judge of the law.”

Chauvin, who is white, is charged with murder in the second and third degree and manslaughter. George Floyd, who was Black, died under his knee on 25 May 2020, triggering a massive resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement in the US and protests coast to coast and overseas.

The judge is now giving the jury detailed guidance about taking notes, which they are encouraged to do, as they will not be given a transcript of the trial before deliberation.

Updated

Members of George Floyd’s family just knelt outside the court house in Minneapolis for eight minutes and 46 seconds, the length of time it has been shown that former police officer Derek Chauvin, now on trial for murder, kneeled on the neck of Floyd, 46, as he begged for mercy.

One of Floyd’s brothers, Terrence Floyd, said: “We are going to get justice, we deserve it.”

Earlier today, the men’s sister, Bridgett Floyd, said: “I wake up every day..still trying to process this” about her brother’s death last May.

Other family members were also at the gathering, as was New York civil rights leader Al Sharpton and family attorney Ben Crump.

Some were wearing face masks to prevent against Covid-19 infection that had pictures of George Floyd’s face on them or, in large digits: “8:46”.

“We are taking a knee for eight minutes and 46 seconds, and we want you to think of during that time, why Chauvin didn’t, in that time get his knee up?,” Sharpton said.

Here’s Bridgett Floyd from earlier this month:

Proceedings are about to begin in the trial in downtown Minneapolis of white former police officer Derek Chauvin, who is charged with the murder of George Floyd, who was Black, last May.

A protester holds a sign outside the Hennepin County Government Center court house before the opening statements in former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin murder trial on March 29
A protester holds a sign outside the Hennepin County Government Center court house before the opening statements in former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin murder trial on March 29 Photograph: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images

We’ll be starting our live stream here in moments. The jury is expected to enter and will receive instructions from the judge in the case, Peter Cahill.

For the first time in Minnesota history, TV cameras will cover the whole trial, live. The judge allowed this because access to the court room has been heavily restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic.

We expect opening arguments to begin around 10.30am ET (9.30am local time or 3.30pm GMT).

The prosecution will open, followed by the defense.

Chauvin was fired from his job last year after Floyd’s death on May 25. He was arrested and charged with murder, initially being held in custody, later being released on bond. He has been in court since the jury selection began a few weeks ago.

He and Floyd’s family are only permitted to use one seat each in court on any given day.

George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, indicated earlier that he will be in court today.

“If George Floyd was a white American citizen, no-one would say it was a hard case. If you cannot get justice in America for a black man for this, what can you get justice for?”

Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump rallying earlier this month in California.
Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump rallying earlier this month in California. Photograph: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

That’s what civil rights lawyer Ben Crump said earlier today. Crump is a high profile lawyer who often gets involved when Black Americans have been killed by police officers or, for example, by white agitators who present themselves as vigilantes.

Crump predicted that Derek Chauvin’s defense team will rip into George Floyd. “They are going to try to assassinate his character,” he said.

“We know the video is the proof. That’s all you need.” -Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, ahead of former police officer Derek Chauvin’s murder trial pic.twitter.com/hYNgUMlNo1

— TODAY (@TODAYshow) March 29, 2021

It’s already been indicated by the defense that they are going to try to focus the jury’s attention on the idea that George Floyd’s cause of death could have been primarily a drugs overdose, coupled with underlying health conditions such as heart disease and high blood pressure.

This could be a hard sell, as both the official autopsy and an independent autopsy noted the other factors but concluded that Floyd’s death was a homicide.

Crump and family members of George Floyd are talking outside the court house in Minneapolis now.

Journalist Amudalat Ajasa is there for the Guardian and we’ll be bringing you her reporting here and in forthcoming articles today.

Here’s the Guardian’s curtain-raiser story:

Updated

'Slam dunk' case against Derek Chauvin: Floyd's brother

George Floyd’s brother Philonise Floyd appeared live on NBC’s Today show this morning, alongside civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, who is representing the family.

Philonise Floyd indicated the family was feeling confident about the trial, even though it is rare for a police officer who has killed a civilian to be arrested and charged, let alone convicted, of murder.

We know that this is a slam dunk, because the video is the proof, that’s all we need,” Philonise said, using the common basketball term.

“We know the video is the proof. That’s all you need.” -Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, ahead of former police officer Derek Chauvin’s murder trial pic.twitter.com/hYNgUMlNo1

— TODAY (@TODAYshow) March 29, 2021

Bystander video that went viral last May shows (now former) Minneapolis police officer kneeling on George Floyd’s neck as Floyd was held prone on the street during an arrest attempt.

Chauvin kept the pressure on for around nine minutes as Floyd first begged for his life and then passed out, with his pulse fading.

“He [Chauvin] killed my brother in broad daylight, it was a modern day lynching,” Philonise Floyd said.

The most serious charge Chauvin faces is second degree murder, which carries a maximum prison term of 40 years.

The Floyd family wants the second degree murder charge to stick, rather than the third degree murder and manslaughter charges with which Chauvin is also charged.

Floyd pointed out that Chauvin and three accompanying officers “were stopping people trying to stop him killing George”.

The video shows bystanders who were pleading for mercy for George Floyd being warned off.

Updated

Opening arguments due today in trial of Derek Chauvin for murder of George Floyd

Good morning, US politics live blog readers, there is a lot going on in Washington and state news – looking at you, Georgia – today and this week. And in Minneapolis, opening arguments are expected to begin this morning in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd last May. We’ll have a livestream of the court proceedings and reports from the streets of the Minnesota city. So please stay tuned.

  • The trial of white former police officer Chauvin, charged with the murder of Floyd, who was Black, gets underway properly today after several weeks of jury selection and legal arguments.
  • It’s so much more than a criminal trial or even a police brutality trial, given that the killing of Floyd re-galvanized the Black Lives Matter movement in the US and triggered a racial reckoning in many places as protests took place around the world.
  • For the first time in Minnesota legal history, the trial will be live-streamed, because access to the court room itself is severely restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic. We will have a live stream today in this blog.
  • Proceedings begin at 9am local time in the Twin Cities, 10am ET/3pm GMT and after jury instructions and some legal this and that, opening arguments are expected, with the prosecution beginning.
  • George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, described on TV this morning his brother’s killing as “a modern day lynching” and predicted a murder conviction will be a “slam dunk” because of the bystander video of Chauvin kneeling on George’s neck.
  • In other news, White House press secretary Jen Psaki will hold a briefing at 12.30pm today.
  • The White House coronavirus team of experts and officials will hold a live briefing at 11am.
  • Joe Biden warned Americans yesterday about letting their guard down against the Covid-19 pandemic, as cases creep up again. He said he expected to say more today after being briefed by his expert team, led by Anthony Fauci, at 1.30pm. The US president is due to make remarks on the vaccine distribution process shortly after.

Updated

Contributors

Gabrielle Canon (now), Joan E Greve and Joanna Walters (earlier)

The GuardianTramp

Related Content

Article image
Trump and Biden attend 9/11 memorial ceremonies – as it happened
Meanwhile, prosecutor reportedly resigns from inquiry into Trump-Russia investigation over concerns about political pressure

Julia Carrie Wong (now), Joan E Greve and Martin Belam (earlier)

12, Sep, 2020 @12:36 AM

Article image
Biden pledges all US adults will be eligible for vaccines by 1 May in pandemic anniversary address – as it happened
President will tout the $1.9tn stimulus package he signed today on anniversary of pandemic – follow all the latest

Maanvi Singh (now), Lauren Gambino, Joanna Walters and Martin Belam (earlier)

12, Mar, 2021 @3:00 AM

Article image
George Floyd’s family urges Biden to pass a policing reform bill – as it happened
President has private White House meeting with members of Floyd’s family – follow all the day’s politics news live

Lois Beckett in Los Angeles and Joan E Greve

26, May, 2021 @12:09 AM

Article image
George Floyd memorials held in Houston and Los Angeles as Democrats unveil reforms – as it happened
Thousands of people come to pay their respects to Floyd. A memorial will be held in Houston Tuesday

Lois Beckett (now) and Joan E Greve and Oliver Holmes (earlier)

09, Jun, 2020 @4:53 AM

Article image
US protests live: hundreds of thousands march against racial injustice – as it happened
Large crowds from coast to coast demonstrate against police killing of George Floyd

Maanvi Singh (now) and Bryan Armen Graham, Tom Lutz and Jessica Murray (earlier)

07, Jun, 2020 @5:35 AM

Article image
George Floyd killing: journalist arrested while reporting on Minneapolis protest; Trump calls protesters 'thugs' - as it happened
Minnesota governor has called on the national guard and Minneapolis has declared a local emergency

Sarah Marsh (now); Michael McGowan, Maanvi Singh in Oakland,Joan E Greve in Washington and Joanna Walters in New York (earlier)

29, May, 2020 @11:54 AM

Article image
US police forcefully crack down on protesters as curfews fail to stop demonstrations – as it happened
President threatens to deploy military as demonstrations continue nationwide

Oliver Holmes, Helen Sullivan, Maanvi Singh , Sam Levin, Joan E Greve and Martin Pengelly

02, Jun, 2020 @10:29 AM

Article image
House passes Biden's $1.9tn Covid relief bill projected to slash US poverty in 2021 – as it happened
House passes the bill, which will now go to the president, Joe Biden, who will sign it on Friday

Maanvi Singh (now), Joan E Greve and Martin Belam (earlier)

11, Mar, 2021 @1:40 AM

Article image
Biden administration pledges to expand vaccinations as winter storms cause delays – as it happened
CDC warns of ‘widespread delays’ in vaccine deliveries due to weather

Maanvi Singh (now) and Joan E Greve (earlier)

18, Feb, 2021 @1:13 AM

Article image
Joe Biden pledges to distribute 100m vaccine shots in first 100 days of presidency – as it happened
President-elect makes pledge to limit spread of coronavirus and reiterates call for Americans to wear masks – follow all the latest

Maanvi Singh (now), Joan E Greve and Martin Belam (earlier)

09, Dec, 2020 @1:04 AM