Equal honours for officers and men | Letter

Trevor Lindley on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s commitment to equal treatment of all ranks in memorials

John Batey is wrong to say “The British army buries its dead in separate sections of ‘officers and men’” (Letters, 23 April). Early in the formation of the then Imperial War Graves Commission, Fabian Ware, founder of the commission, stated that “no distinction should be made between officers and men lying in the same cemeteries in the form or nature of the memorials”.

In January 1918, the commission said the “governing consideration” in its decision on the uniformity of military graves was that “those who have given their lives are members of one family … and that, in death, all, from General to Private, of whatever race or creed, should receive equal honour under a memorial which should be the common symbol of their comradeship and of the cause for which they died”.
Trevor Lindley
Weymouth, Dorset

Have an opinion on anything you’ve read in the Guardian today? Please email us your letter and it will be considered for publication.

Letters

The GuardianTramp

Related Content

Article image
The Quaker told he was too young to have a conscience | Letters
Letters: It is not correct to say that before 1916 many conscientious objectors went to prison, writes William Hetherington, honorary archivist of the Peace Pledge Union

Letters

13, Nov, 2018 @5:48 PM

Article image
They shoot horses, don’t they – but not if disguised | Letter
Letter: Bruce Vivash Jones on a successful move to camouflage horses during the first world war

Letters

10, Oct, 2018 @4:55 PM

Article image
Growing culture of militarism in UK | Letters
Letters: The armed forces are far less open to democratic and public scrutiny than almost any other major institution, writes Symon Hill; while Clive Barrett remembers the first world war’s conscientious objectors

Letters

26, Apr, 2018 @4:31 PM

Article image
Honouring conscientious objectors | Letters
Letters: Readers respond to news that English Heritage is launching a project to highlight the stories of conscientious objectors imprisoned in Richmond Castle

Letters

26, Jul, 2019 @3:27 PM

Article image
Dancing along to the Pet Shop Boys beat | Brief letters
Brief letters: Pub modernisation | Race and Lee Enfield rifles | Pop synchronicity | Female bass players

Letters

22, Oct, 2018 @4:34 PM

Article image
The importance of the battle of Amiens | Letters
Letters: Rory Newman on the factors that made the action a key move towards ending the war

Letters

07, Aug, 2018 @5:24 PM

Article image
Victims of conflict do not die in glory | Letters
Letters: In response to the changing meaning of the red poppy, Anthony Matthew argues that military pomp can hide the disaster of war, while Barbara Crowther describes a local memorial to all victims

Letters

17, Oct, 2019 @5:01 PM

Article image
Racist treatment of black and Asian war dead is acknowledged at last | Letters
Letters: Readers respond to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s report into the unequal commemoration of soldiers in the first world war

Letters

22, Apr, 2021 @5:18 PM

Article image
Lest we forget? Many victims of the first world war are already forgotten | Letters
Letters: Nora Crook on the losses of the Caribbean, Brian McGuckin on Scots who died, Alison Hardie on the Chinese Labour Corps, Kate Purcell on the women left without husbands, and Marika Sherwood on the price paid where it all began: in Africa. Plus, letters from Barry Winkleman and Sirkka Betts

Letters

12, Nov, 2018 @6:01 PM

Article image
Cultural enrichment brought by refugees | Letters
Letters: Susan Hofsteede and Jinty Nelson on the contributions made to Britain by people fleeing the Nazis, Robin Prior on The Grapes of Wrath and today’s refugees, and Mary Radoux Gomez on her aunt’s escape to the UK in 1914

Letters

02, Jan, 2019 @5:00 PM