Afternoon summary

  • Johnson has told G7 leaders at the start of their summit they should stop inequalities becoming “entrenched” after the Covid pandemic. (See 3.09pm and 4.01pm.)
  • Johnson has rejected claims that his plan for the UK to donate 100m doses of vaccine to poorer countries over the next year does not go far enough. (See 9.18am) He has said that he wants a total of one billion doses of vaccine to be pledged to developing countries at the G7 summit. Given that the US has already promised a 500m-dose donation, he is 60% of the way there already. (See 9.40am.) But aid campaigners say Johnson’s target is not ambitious enough. (See 4.14pm.)

Updated

From AFP’s Deborah Cole

I see the protocol people of the world really learned their lesson about sidelining the women #G7Cornwall pic.twitter.com/LcYelYNOnW

— Deborah Cole (@doberah) June 11, 2021

From the French embassy in the UK’s Twitter account

"We have a responsibility to set ourselves clear goals and make concrete commitments to tackle the challenges of our time. This #G7Summit must be the summit of action. Happy to be with you again, dear partners and friends. Let's get to work, together" - French President https://t.co/Xmb0FYhO0W

— French Embassy UK (@FranceintheUK) June 11, 2021

From Bloomberg’s Josh Wingrove

President Biden will attend a reception with the G-7 leaders, the Queen and other members of the Royal Family tonight here in Cornwall. He previously met the Queen in 1982, per the White House.

— Josh Wingrove (@josh_wingrove) June 11, 2021

Jennifer Jacobs from Bloomberg has a picture of the bicycle that Joe Biden gave Boris Johnson yesterday in the usual exchange of gifts on a transatlantic visit.

Pictures of the “Boris Bike” and helmet from Philadelphia-based @bilenkycycles that Biden gave UK’s Boris Johnson, who was the 1st foreign leader he met with on his 1st overseas trip as president. pic.twitter.com/indVyn6JuS

— Jennifer Jacobs (@JenniferJJacobs) June 11, 2021

As the Times’ Patrick Maguire points out, Johnson’s gift to Biden was not in the same league.

Boris Johnson gave Biden a framed photograph of a mural of Frederick Douglass yesterday. So far so thoughtful.

Except... the Foreign Office found the free-to-use pic on the *Wikipedia page* for Douglass and then had it printed.

Biden, meanwhile, gave PM a $6k custom-made bike.

— Patrick Maguire (@patrickkmaguire) June 11, 2021

More from @EleniCourea, only in this morning's Times, here – and in @timesredbox

Surely up there – or down there – with Obama's box of DVDs for Brown? https://t.co/I6T7FjUdCa

— Patrick Maguire (@patrickkmaguire) June 11, 2021

Global Citizen, a global anti-poverty campaigning group, has also criticised the UK’s vaccine offer (see 9.18am) as not going far enough. Marie Rumsby, its UK country director, said:

We are disappointed by today’s announcement with the UK only planning to share five million doses by September, when the world urgently needs 1 billion doses by this date. As the G7 host, and a country whose vaccination rate is one of the highest in the world, PM Boris Johnson needs to donate more vaccine doses now, not next year, to ensure equitable vaccine access globally.


Extinction Rebellion activists taking part in the “Sound The Alarm” march during the G7 summit in Cornwall today.
Extinction Rebellion activists taking part in the “Sound The Alarm” march during the G7 summit in Cornwall today. Photograph: William Dax/Getty Images

Downing Street has refused to rule out the prospect of the UK taking unilateral action to ensure British sausages can continue to go to Northern Ireland, PA Media reports. Asked if the government would be willing to extend the opt-out for chilled meats from Northern Ireland protocol rules, which is due to end from July, the PM’s spokesman told journalists: “We keep all options on the table”. As PA reports, the stance risks inflaming tensions with the European Union ahead of Boris Johnson’s meetings with the bloc’s leaders on Saturday.

Tom Newton Dunn from Times Radio has the timetable for those meetings.

The PM's bilats tomorrow morning, just announced by No10: Macron 8am, Merkel 8.40am, UVDL and Michel, 9.20am. Suspect he'll love every second of those.

— Tom Newton Dunn (@tnewtondunn) June 11, 2021

Sarah Brown, wife of the former Labour prime minister Gordon Brown and chair of Theirworld, the global children’s charity she founded, has said the aid spending announced by the UK government this afternoon for education (see 4.37pm) does not go far enough. In a statement she said:

The commitment to global education from the UK government is a welcome first step in the right direction - but doesn’t go far enough, especially as it comes against a backdrop of savage cuts to the international aid budget which will push the world’s poorest people further to the margins.

The funding is a drop in the ocean compared to the scale of the global education crisis - with these three pledges representing just 0.33% of the $75bn per year needed from donors to close the global education funding gap.

The UK government must use today as a starting point - not the end point - for bold action to get every child in the world into school and give them the future they deserve. This must include the UK reversing its decision to cut its international aid budget.

Unless this happens, hundreds of millions of children around the world will have their futures put at risk and the efforts to recover after this pandemic will be seriously undermined.

Helicopters parked on the runway at Newquay airport, Cornwall, today for use by VIPs attending the G7 summit.
Helicopters parked on the runway at Newquay airport, Cornwall, today for use by VIPs attending the G7 summit. Photograph: Jon Rowley/INTERNATIONAL POOL/EPA

Downing Street has announced that the UK will be spending £430m on education in developing countries, with the funding going to the Global Partnership for Education. In a news release, Boris Johnson said:

The best way we can lift countries out of poverty and lead a global recovery is by investing in education and particularly girls’ education.

It is a source of international shame that every day around the world children bursting with potential are denied the chance to become titans of industry, scientific pioneers or leaders in any field, purely because they are female, their parents’ income or the place they were born.

I am calling on other world leaders, including those here at the G7, to also donate and put us firmly on a path to get more girls into the classroom, address the terrible setback to global education caused by coronavirus and help the world build back better.

Boris Johnson chairing the opening G7 meeting.
Boris Johnson chairing the opening G7 meeting.
Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Aid experts express concern G7 vaccine measures will not meet challenge of what's needed

There is a sense of foreboding and expectation about the pace at which the G7 is addressing the issue of the distribution of vaccines to Africa, with many concerned that the G7 leaders are not going to get the urgency of this right.

Here is one example that captures the flavour from the film-maker Richard Curtis, a UN advocate for the sustainable development goals. He told the Guardian:

This weekend world leaders have the opportunity to show they are serious about achieving the UN global goals for sustainable development – a historic plan they all signed up to in 2015. That plan included a commitment to deliver good health and wellbeing for everyone - which Covid has made the central challenge facing the world. We need to see a real historic deal on vaccines at this summit. It’s a unique moment for brave global leadership, it isn’t about nice half measures, it’s about making sure one billion doses are delivered worldwide by September, sharing knowledge and getting a global financing deal to help vaccinate the world.

This G7 summit is an opportunity to help make Covid history. Seven people in a room doing the extraordinary thing, by being brave, of saving countless lives and all our economies. I hope and pray that Prime Minister Johnson will lead the way.

Kirsty McNeill, policy director at Save the Children is also worried that a gap is appearing this year in supply that the offers by G7 nations is not meeting. She said:

It is ultimately the agreement or not of a global financing plan to vaccinate the world on which this summit – held as the pandemic still rages - will be judged. The education and dose sharing announcements provide some foundations, but the jury is still out on whether the prime minister will lead the G7 or merely host them.

David Miliband, the president of the International Rescue Committee, speaking at a Brookings Institution event, was equally stark, saying:

We are winning the race between vaccines and variants in the rich world and losing the race in the poor world. There is a danger that victory is declared in the rich world before the battle has even been engaged in the poor world. We are taking a massive risk.

He added: “We need to focus on not just redistribution, but also distribution of vaccines.” He also said it was “important to see this not just as an issue of overseas aid since that misses the scale of this”.

Updated

How credible is Johnson's anti-inequality plea for G7?

Boris Johnson crammed quite a lot into the statement he delivered as he opened the first formal meeting of the G7. It was creative and audacious, potentially inspiring, but not always tactful, and perhaps not plausible. Here are the four key points he made, with analysis of their credibility.

  • Johnson said the G7 should stop inequalities becoming “entrenched” after the Covid pandemic. He said:

What’s gone wrong with this pandemic, or what risks being a lasting scar, is that inequalities may be entrenched. And we need to make sure that, as we recover, we level up across our societies and we rebuild back better.

This is wholly laudable. And it reflects one of the concerns raised by the G7 gender equality advisory council, which is making a presentation to the summit this afternoon (see 11.17am), although there is also copious evidence, in Britain and worldwide, that the pandemic will exacerbate inequalities.

But in speaking about wanting to “level up” and “build back better”, Johnson was deploying Tory slogans, and for a moment it sounded as if he were trying to co-opt the G7 into a party campaign video.

More seriously, his comment invites scrutiny about how serious Johnson really is about tackling inequality. He is committed to levelling up in the UK, but he has avoiding setting any precise benchmarks for how this should be measured, and he does not seem to see it as a commitment to reducing inequalities of income or wealth. He sees it in terms of infrastructure spending, and extending opportunity.

Less than two weeks ago Johnson’s educational recovery commissioner resigned because he thought Johnson was not doing anything like enough to make up for lost learning during the pandemic, a problem set to increase educational inequalities.

In the past Johnson actually defended inequality. In 2013 he gave a speech saying “some measure of inequality”, like greed, was, “a valuable spur to economic activity”.

  • Johnson suggested that the austerity introduced after the 2008 financial crash was a mistake, or at least went too far. He said:

It is vital that we don’t repeat the mistake of the last great crisis, the last great economic recession in 2008, when the recovery was not uniform across all parts of society.

Johnson has said before that he does not like the term austerity, and as prime minister he has shown a desire to increase public spending that shows he is no George Osborne. But it is still a little surprising to see him use an international forum to effectively dismiss the central economic policy of his predecessor-but-one as prime minister and Conservative leader.

This was also another example of Johnson saying “we” when it sounded as if he was actually talking about Britain. Not all G7 countries responded to the financial crash with austerity on an Osborne scale.

  • Johnson claimed that spending on green energy initiatives would reduce inequality. He said:

And I actually think that we have a huge opportunity to [build back better] because, as G7, we are united in our vision for a cleaner, greener world, a solution to the problems of climate change. And in those ideas, in those technologies, which we’re all addressing together, I think there is the potential to generate many, many millions of high-wage, high-skill jobs.

This was a clever attempt to link two policy goals to which he is personally committed: levelling up, and addressing the climate crisis. But is this any more than just wishful thinking? Investment might generate a more equal society, but it might not; other policy levers are as or more important.

  • Johnson suggested all governments had made mistakes in their handling of Covid. He said:

Given the pandemic we need to make sure that we don’t repeat some of the errors that we doubtless made in the course of the last 18 months or so.

Johnson has already admitted his government made many errors handing Covid. But this comment appears to minimise his responsibility, by implying that all governments were much the same. In fact, Britain had the highest levels of excess deaths in Europe by last summer, although since then other countries have overtaken it. Johnson also seemed to be overlooking the fact that Joe Biden only took office in January, and Mario Draghi only took office in February.

Boris Johnson speaking at the first session of the G7
Boris Johnson speaking at the first session of the G7. Photograph: Sky News

Updated

Johnson says G7 must stop inequalities being 'entrenched' after Covid

Here is the opening statement that Boris Johnson delivered as the first session of the G7 summit got under way.

Given the pandemic we need to make sure that we don’t repeat some of the errors that we doubtless made in the course of the last 18 months or so. And we need to make sure that we now allow our economies to recover.

And I think that they have the potential to bounce back very strongly. And there’s all sorts of reasons for being optimistic, but it is vital that we don’t repeat the mistake of the last great crisis, the last great economic recession in 2008, when the recovery was not uniform across all parts of society.

And I think what’s gone wrong with this pandemic, or what risks being a lasting scar, is that inequalities may be entrenched. And we need to make sure that, as we recover, we level up across our societies and we rebuild back better.

And I actually think that we have a huge opportunity to do that because, as G7, we are united in our vision for a cleaner, greener world, a solution to the problems of climate change. And in those ideas, in those technologies, which we’re all addressing together, I think there is the potential to generate many, many millions of high-wage, high-skill jobs.

And I think that is what the people of our countries now want us to focus on. They wanted to be sure that we’re beating the pandemic together, discussing how we’ll never have a repeat of what we’ve seen, but also that we’re building better together, and building back greener and building back fairer, and building back more equal, in a more gender-neutral and perhaps a more feminine way - how about that?

So those are some of the objectives that we have before us at Carbis Bay.

Often these statements are platitudinous, but this one is quite intriguing. I’ll post an analysis shortly.

Updated

Boris Johnson chairs G7 summit's opening meeting, saying world should 'level up' after pandemic

The first formal session of the G7 is now getting under way.

Broadcasters have been allowed to film Boris Johnson making an opening statement, in which he said the world needed to “level up” after the damage caused by the pandemic.

His fellow G7 leaders may not have realised they were being aligned with a Tory slogan.

I will post more from Johnson’s comments shortly.

Boris Johnson chairing first meeting of G7 summit
Boris Johnson chairing first meeting of G7 summit Photograph: Sky News

Updated

Here is a Guardian video featuring some of the G7 protests.

A police officer billeted on the cruise ship the MS Silja anchored off Falmouth has tested positive for Covid. Devon and Cornwall police said:

As part of our testing regime, during the early hours of 11 June we have identified one officer who is currently supporting G7 policing and accommodated on the ferry, has given a positive lateral flow test for Covid-19.

The officer, plus those who have come into close contact, are currently self-isolating at another designated location.

All who have come into close contact or are in the bubble of those who tested positive are also currently self-isolating which equates to 12 officers in total. The next stage is for those who have tested positive to undertake a PCR test. We are continuing to follow the advice of Public Health England.

Around 1,000 officers are staying on the the MS Silja.

A police officer on duty in Cornwall at the G7 summit.
A police officer on duty in Cornwall at the G7 summit. Photograph: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Boris Johnson and his Italian counterpart, Mario Draghi, “spoke about their countries’ respective experiences during the pandemic and shared work through the UK and Italy’s presidencies of the G7 and G20 to ensure the world is better prepared for future health crises”, according to the No 10 readout of their bilateral earlier.

Updated

Police officers walk with activists on the Extinction Rebellion climate crisis protest march on the beach in St Ives, with a naval vessel in the background.
Police officers walk with activists on the Extinction Rebellion climate crisis protest march on the beach in St Ives, with a naval vessel in the background. Photograph: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Jill Biden, the US first lady, and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to Connor Downs Academy, in Hayle, Cornwall, earlier today.
Jill Biden, the US first lady, and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to Connor Downs Academy, in Hayle, Cornwall, earlier today. Photograph: Reuters

The G7 is becoming more relevant, the former prime minister Tony Blair has claimed. In an interview for Politico’s Westminster Insider podcast, he said there was a time when people thought it would be eclipsed by the G20 (which became more important after the 2008 financial crisis, partly because of what happened at the G20 summit in London hosted by Blair’s successor, Gordon Brown). Blair explained:

There was a time when the tensions were much less between the west and China, and then the G20, for very obvious reasons, seemed to be almost supplanting the G7. But what’s happened in the last few years is relations with China have become much more strained – and one thing that has really not altered from the Trump administration to the Biden administration is an increasingly tough position towards China.

Updated

Boris Johnson and his wife, Carrie, have been formally posing for welcome photographs with the leaders attending the summit. They have just finished now, and the family photograph will happen in a moment.

Boris Johnson and his wife Carrie on the beach at Carbis Bay, shortly before they posed for formal welcome photographs with all the leaders attending the summit.
Boris Johnson and his wife Carrie on the beach at Carbis Bay, shortly before they posed for formal welcome photographs with all the leaders attending the summit. Photograph: Phil Noble/Reuters

Updated

Downing Street has released its readout of Boris Johnson’s meeting with Justin Trudeau, his Canadian opposite number. According to No 10, in the talks Johnson noted “the remarkable alignment between the UK’s and Canada’s foreign policy goals, including our shared work to increase girls’ education, defend media freedom, tackle climate change and protect human rights around the world”.

The two leaders also said they would “redouble their efforts to secure an FTA [free trade agreement] as soon as possible”, Downing Street said.

Boris Johnson (right) with Justin Trudeau at the G7.
Boris Johnson (right) with Justin Trudeau at the G7. Photograph: Alastair Grant/PA

Updated

Extinction Rebellion is staging a “Sound the Alarm” protest to coincide with the G7 summit. It is highlighting “the disastrous consequences of the G7’s broken promises for people in the global south already experiencing the effects of climate and ecological collapse”, the group says.

Gail Bradbrook, the XR co-founder, said:

We know we can’t trust the leaders of the world. They have already failed us in Paris. They are part of a broken system, but humanity isn’t broken. We’re gathering in Cornwall in solidarity with communities on the front line across the world. For the countries and people most vulnerable to rising temperatures, climate change is not something for the future: it is happening right now.

Extinction Rebellion activists taking part in the “Sound The Alarm” march in St Ives, Cornwall.
Extinction Rebellion activists taking part in the “Sound The Alarm” march in St Ives, Cornwall. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Micheál Martin, the Irish taoiseach (PM) is not at the G7 summit. But he is the EU national leader with most interest in the fate of the Northern Ireland protocol and, after a meeting of the British-Irish Council, he said he hoped that UK-EU talks on resolving the problems relating to the protocol would “pick up momentum”. He said:

There are issues to be refined and resolved and we acknowledge that, but we believe the mechanisms within the framework agreement facilitate that. I think there is opportunity within that framework to resolve this.

I think discussions should pick up momentum, they did it before prior to the Brexit deal being signed off so, in my view, it is in the capacity of both the UK government and the European Union to arrive at an agreement here.

Updated

A man sweeping the sand on the beach at Carbis Bay ahead of the family photo for G7 leaders being taken shortly.
A man sweeping the sand on the beach at Carbis Bay ahead of the family photo for G7 leaders being taken shortly. Photograph: Neil Hall/INTERNATIONAL POOL/EPA

This is from Oxfam, which is urging other G7 countries to join the US and France in backing a temporary waiver of intellectual property rights for Covid vaccines.

.@POTUS and @EmmanuelMacron support the waiver of vaccine patents, why don’t @BorisJohnson and other #G7 Leaders? We're here to say people must come before pharma profits.

Vaccine recipes must be shared to increase supplies and vaccinate the world🌍

We need a #PeoplesVaccine pic.twitter.com/9KDGY8Lkdl

— Oxfam GB Campaigns (@oxfamcampaigns) June 11, 2021

Emmanuel Macron, the French president, has tweeted a picture of the EU pre-summit caucus. He is stressing European unity.

Comme toujours, une même union, une même détermination à agir, un même enthousiasme ! Le G7 peut commencer. pic.twitter.com/RPqZ2XMGMb

— Emmanuel Macron (@EmmanuelMacron) June 11, 2021

Robert Peston, ITV’s political editor, thinks this means Boris Johnson will face pressure over the Northern Ireland protocol.

Note that @EmmanuelMacron wants us to see that the five EU leaders are a caucus, here in Cornwall. @BorisJohnson will struggle to prevent them raising what they see as his planned breach of the Northern Ireland protocol. He is still under Brexit’s long shadow https://t.co/8GGe3iV35U

— Robert Peston (@Peston) June 11, 2021

Ursula von der Leyen, the European Commission president, posted this on Twitter earlier, saying her first task on arrival at the G7 summit at Carbis Bay would be to hold a meeting with fellow EU leaders. Think of it as the EU caucus.

Today the world's eyes are on Cornwall 🇬🇧 as we meet for the 1st day of @G7.

Global recovery, health, climate, development, security - we have 3 days to come together and bring the change that people expect.

To start, I will have a meeting with G7 EU leaders, to coordinate. pic.twitter.com/2FChRkl1Hk

— Ursula von der Leyen (@vonderleyen) June 11, 2021

Perhaps this is the meeting she was referring to ...

Left to right: European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, France’s president Emmanuel Macron, European Council president Charles Michel, German chancellor Angela Merkel and Italy’s PM Mario Draghi at Carbis Bay.
Left to right: European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, France’s president Emmanuel Macron, European Council president Charles Michel, German chancellor Angela Merkel and Italy’s PM Mario Draghi at Carbis Bay. Photograph: Phil Noble/EPA

Updated

Japan’s PM, Yoshihide Suga (left), the French president, Emmanuel Macron (centre) and Italy’s PM, Mario Draghi, at Carbis Bay
Japan’s PM, Yoshihide Suga (left), the French president, Emmanuel Macron (centre) and Italy’s PM, Mario Draghi, at Carbis Bay. Photograph: Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Updated

President Biden has just posted this on Twitter about the G7.

It’s the first official day of the G7 Summit here in the United Kingdom. I’m looking forward to reinforcing our commitment to multilateralism and working with our allies and partners to build a more fair and inclusive global economy.

Let’s get to work.

— President Biden (@POTUS) June 11, 2021

The White House has also issued this statement about the US economic goals for the summit.

And here is the transcript from a more detailed White House briefing setting out what Biden wants to achieve in more detail. A senior administration official told reporters:

On Covid-19, as we’ve already talked about, not only will there be a significant commitment of doses, but an embrace of a broader roadmap to help end the pandemic.

On climate, we will have more to say over the next couple of days, but the G7 countries will not only recommit to what they’ve laid out at the president’s leaders summit on climate, as well as their own national contributions, but there will be tangible action proposed and adopted at this G7, on climate.

And then, in terms of infrastructure and the enormous need for low- and middle-income countries around the world to have their infrastructure requirements met, the G7+ will embrace a high-standards, transparent, climate-friendly, non-corrupt mechanism for investing in the physical, digital, and health infrastructure of low- and middle-income countries. It will be an alternative to that which other countries, including China, are offering.

And then, of course, there will be discussion of all of the hotspots and the key regional challenges, as well as the way in which new technologies are reshaping our world. So they will discuss ransomware and how to set the rules of the road on all forms of emerging technology so that it’s democracies, and not autocracies, who are laying the foundation for standards as we go forward.

All of this will end up getting enshrined in the G7 leaders communiqué that will be released at the conclusion of the summit. There will be a few other leader-level documents as well, but that’s the broad basis of what we’re trying to accomplish: meaningful outcomes on Covid, on climate, on the global economy, on infrastructure, on ransomware, and cyber.

This briefing (especially the passage I have highlighted in bold) confirms that, in his first overseas visit as president, Biden is preoccupied with strengthening democratic alliances against China. Or, as my colleague Rafael Behr put it in a very good column this week: “[Biden] is not flying across the Atlantic to wallow in nostalgia for the alliances that won the first cold war. He is drumming up recruits for the second one.”

Updated

Boris Johnson has had a meeting with his Japanese opposite number, Yoshihide Suga. According to the No 10 read-out, Johnson “expressed his support for the Tokyo Olympics, and welcomed Japanese efforts to ensure the games can take place safely”. Suga is pressing ahead with the Olympics even though many Japanese people think they should be cancelled, and perhaps Johnson sees Suga as a fellow member of the fan club for the mayor in Jaws.

According to No 10, the two leaders also agreed that the deployment of the UK’s Carrier Strike Group to Japan would be “a pivotal moment for UK-Japan defence cooperation”.

Boris Johnson (right) with the Japanese PM Yoshihide Suga
Boris Johnson (right) with the Japanese PM, Yoshihide Suga. Photograph: No 10 Flickr account

Updated

The UK-US joint statement (pdf) released yesterday alongside the new Atlantic Charter also said the two countries would convene “the first US-UK bilateral cancer summit” to “share ideas and identify opportunities for collaboration to accelerate advances in lifesaving approaches to cancer, which remains a leading cause of death worldwide”.

Michelle Mitchell, chief executive of Cancer Research UK, has welcomed this as “huge news”.

Huge news from #G7: @10DowningStreet and @POTUS will convene the first bilateral UK/US cancer summit.
Cancer is one of the greatest global challenges - no country can solve it alone. Hope this leads to more collaboration & progress for people with cancer https://t.co/upCwqkcI5A

— Michelle Mitchell (@Michelle_CRUK) June 11, 2021

Activists from the climate crisis protest group Extinction Rebellion, dressed in red robes and known as the ‘Red Brigade’, demonstrate in St Ives, Cornwall, near where the G7 is being held.
Activists from the climate crisis protest group Extinction Rebellion, dressed in red robes and known as the ‘Red Brigade’, demonstrate in St Ives, Cornwall, near where the G7 is being held. Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday Boris Johnson and Joe Biden published their new “Atlantic Charter” (pdf), with an accompanying UK-US joint statement (pdf). Faisal Islam, the BBC’s economics editor, has been looking at the detail and he says there is no reference in it to a comprehensive trade deal.

Interesting wide ranging 5 page joint statement between PM and President Biden - but notably no reference at all to a “comprehensive trade agreement” as there was in the previous ones with President Trumphttps://t.co/rk9Zvoz8fk pic.twitter.com/KgQw1hLjV6

— Faisal Islam (@faisalislam) June 10, 2021

Here’s the equivalent paragraph from the statement with Trump in 2019... pic.twitter.com/WX8Hsj7d8x

— Faisal Islam (@faisalislam) June 10, 2021

Five people including two police officers have been injured in a crash between a police Volvo and a VW Golf near the venue for the G7 summit in Cornwall.

The Devon and Cornwall force has referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct and its professional standards department, as is routine when a police vehicle is involved.

The driver of the VW golf, a man in his 20s, was taken to Treliske hospital in Truro with serious leg injuries. Two passengers were treated for minor injuries.

Two police officers were also taken to hospital for treatment for suspected fractures.

Updated

The town of St Ives and village of Carbis Bay are bracing themselves for three days of protests and demonstrations.

They began, artistically, with a depiction of a mass stranding of mermaids, tangled in discarded fishing nets by Ocean Rebellion.

The Ocean Rebellion stranded mermaids protest
The Ocean Rebellion stranded mermaids protest. Photograph: Guy Reece

Rob Higgs and Sophie Miller, co-founders of Ocean Rebellion, sounded a foghorn aimed in the direction of the leaders’ digs in Carbis Bay at dawn. They sounded five blasts, signifying danger. “What it really means,” said Rob, is “Fuck we’re going to crash. That’s the message we want to get over.”

The mood of the demonstrators so far has been determined – but gentle. But a huge police presence is on standby.

Toni Carver, the editor of the St Ives Times and Echo, pointed out that there had been hardly any mention of G7 at the town council’s meeting on Thursday. He said:

Most of it was taken up interviewing four potential new councillors all expressed their deep concern over the lack of affordable housing for local people, and lack of accommodation for working folk. Basically, coming out of Covid - unless you are a direct beneficiary - G7 is the last thing St Ives needed. Feasting at Tregenna, food banks at Penbeagle!

Updated

Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, arrives at Cornwall airport, Newquay, ahead of the G7 summit.
Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, arrives at Cornwall airport, Newquay, ahead of the G7 summit. Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/PA

There’s a mixture of excitement, trepidation and annoyance among locals and holidaymakers in Carbis Bay and St Ives.

The town mayor, Kirsty Arthur, said Carbis Bay residents were fed up that five-minute trips were being turned into two-hour marathons because of the roadblocks and security.

But others, including her two children, were loving the time off school and the sight of naval ships off the coast, helicopters in the air and presidential cavalcade. “It is quite a show,” she said.

St Ives itself is not as busy as it would be on a normal warm June day. Megan Steeds, who runs a boat hire business on the harbour front, said her trade was 60% down, with many visitors put off by the signs on the A30 telling people to avoid the area. “It’s cost us a lot,” she said. “I’ll be glad when they’ve gone.”

Officers on patrol outside a hotel in Tregenna Castle, near St Ives
Officers on patrol outside a hotel in Tregenna Castle, near St Ives. Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Updated

Kim Darroch, who resigned as the British ambassador to the US in 2019, partly because Boris Johnson refused to support him after a leak of Lord Darroch’s dispatches to London angered Donald Trump, has told the BBC’s Newscast that this summit will be a test of Johnson’s diplomacy skills. Johnson has the charm and personality to carry it off, Darroch said. But he said G7 leaders would also be looking to see whether Johnson was in command of the detail too.

Has Boris Johnson got the right diplomatic skills for the G7?

Lord Kim Darroch, former British ambassador to the US, tells @AdamFleming he will be tested in Cornwall.

Listen to Newscast, the podcast, on BBC Sounds 🎧 https://t.co/8EFeGb0pK4 pic.twitter.com/kvlbwUW6CW

— BBC Sounds (@BBCSounds) June 11, 2021

Updated

The climate crisis campaigners Extinction Rebellion are holding protest events outside the G7 summit. This account has been tweeting pictures of some of their campaign stunts. There is more detail about their campaigns on their website.

World leaders enjoying our uncooperative Crusty, Climate Pasties. See if you can spot one today 🥟. #ActNow #G7ActNow #DrowningInPromises #StopFundingFossils @XRSouthWest @XRebellionUK pic.twitter.com/E3f1zF3RPR

— XR St Ives (@IvesXr) June 11, 2021

Mario Draghi, the Italian prime minister, arriving at Cornwall airport in Newquay this morning ahead of the G7 summit
Mario Draghi, the Italian prime minister, arriving at Cornwall airport in Newquay this morning ahead of the G7 summit.
Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/PA

Updated

G7 leaders will be told today that the Covid crisis will set back gender equality globally unless governments take urgent action to stop this.

This is one of the main conclusions from the G7 gender equality advisory council (GEAC). In its 23-page report (pdf) it says:

Our starting point this year is the mounting evidence that Covid-19 risks a step back for gender equality globally, unless governments take urgent action. Despite the centrality of women in the response, the Covid-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on women and girls everywhere by exacerbating existing inequalities. The GEAC’s analysis has focused in particular on three linked, core themes: girls’ education and the participation of women and girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); women’s empowerment; and eradicating violence against women and girls.

Among its 14 recommendations, the GEAC calls for “an acknowledgement of the disproportionate effect of Covid-19 on women and girls, globally, and increased funding for, and dedicated action towards gender transformative development programming, sexual and reproductive health services, and addressing the ‘shadow pandemic’ of violence against women and girls (VAWG).”

The GEAC is chaired by Sarah Sands, a former editor of the Evening Standard and the Today programme and a colleague of Boris Johnson’s when they both worked for the Daily Telegraph. She will present the panel’s findings in a virtual presentation to G7 leaders this afternoon. There is a G7 news release about what she will say here.

Updated

A protest banner on display today in St Ives, Cornwall
A protest banner on display today in St Ives, Cornwall. Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Updated

The mother of Harry Dunn, the teenage motorcyclist killed in a road collision, has welcomed the news that Boris Johnson raised the case with Joe Biden in their talks yesterday.

Dunn died in 2019 after the car of a US citizen, Anne Sacoolas, collided with his motorbike, moments after she had left the RAF base where her husband worked for a US intelligence agency. Sacoolas returned to the US soon afterwards, claiming diplomatic immunity, and the US has resisted attempts to get her to return to the UK to face trial.

Charlotte Charles, Dunn’s mother, told PA Media:

We are incredibly grateful that Harry’s case is being taken so seriously as to be raised on the eve of the G7 meeting with so many worldwide crises going on.

We very much hope that President Biden takes a different view to the previous administration given his deeply personal connection to the case having suffered loss in similar circumstances.

Updated

Emmanuel Macron, the French president, arriving in Cornwall for the G7 summit with his wife Brigitte.
Emmanuel Macron, the French president, arriving in Cornwall for the G7 summit with his wife, Brigitte. Photograph: James Veysey/REX/Shutterstock

Updated

This is from Lis Wallace, head of UK advocacy at the global anti-poverty campaign group ONE, on Boris Johnson’s vaccine announcement. (See 9.18am.)

There’s a lot to like here but it’s not happening anywhere near fast enough.

It’s great news that Boris Johnson has decided to come to the G7 with a plan to share vaccine doses but if he really wants to be the “host with most” at his own party then he needs to go further. This means starting to share doses right now to counter the current global vaccine crisis.

Really the G7’s aim to provide 1 billion doses should be seen as an absolute minimum, and the timeframe needs to speed up. This must be backed by additional funding and a fully costed plan to end the pandemic for good.

The full ONE statement is here.

A police boat getting ready to go out on patrol at St Ives, near where the G7 summit is taking place.
A police boat getting ready to go out on patrol at St Ives, near where the G7 summit is taking place. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

Seven people arrested near G7 after cars found with smoke grenades

Seven people have been arrested after two vehicles travelling near the G7 summit were found to contain paint, smoke grenades and loud hailers, PA Media reports. PA says:

Devon and Cornwall police confirmed that officers carried out a vehicle stop on a car and a van near Loggans Road in Hayle - about seven miles from the Carbis Bay Hotel.

The force said that during the stop, at about 5pm on Thursday, the vehicles were searched and the items were found inside.

A 30-year-old man from London, a 21-year-old woman from Wales and a 20-year-old man from Bournemouth were arrested on suspicion of possession of an article with intent to commit criminal damage.

Two men from London aged 25 and 27, a 45-year-old woman from London and a 26-year-old woman from Epsom were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to commit public nuisance.

A force spokesman said all seven remain in police custody.

He added: “The items and the vehicles have been seized by police as part of ongoing inquiries in relation to this matter.

“We continue to support the facilitation of safe and legal protest but criminal activity and public disorder will not be tolerated.”

Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, arriving in Cornwall for the G7 summit.
Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, arriving in Cornwall for the G7 summit.
Photograph: James Veysey/Rex/Shutterstock

Updated

A poster on a barge in the harbour of Falmouth, Cornwall, put in place by climate campaigners. The G7 media centre is in Falmouth, on Cornwall’s south coast, even though the summit is at Carbis Bay, on Cornwall’s north coast.
A poster on a barge in the harbour of Falmouth, Cornwall, put in place by climate campaigners. The G7 media centre is in Falmouth, on Cornwall’s south coast, even though the summit is at Carbis Bay, on Cornwall’s north coast. Photograph: Alberto Pezzali/AP

Who's attending the G7 summit?

The G7 is a group of wealthy, democratic countries. It started life as a G6, Russia was included for a period, making a G8, until it was kicked out for annexing Crimea, and today the leaders of the seven core countries will be in Cornwall. They are:

Boris Johnson (UK)

Joe Biden (US)

Angela Merkel (Germany)

Emmanuel Macron (France)

Mario Draghi (Italy)

Justin Trudeau (Canada)

Yoshihide Suga (Japan)

Although it is the G7, the European Union is also a member and it will be represented by two of its three presidents:

Charles Michel, the president of the European Council (which comprises leaders of EU member states)

Ursula von der Leyen, the president of the European Commission (the organisation that runs the EU full-time).

But G7 hosts often decide to invite other leaders to attend and Johnson has invited the leaders of four other major democracies to attend. Last year he added India, Australia and South Korea to the list, in the hope of turning the group into a big, less Eurocentric “D10” group of major democracies. But South Africa was subsequently invited too, ostensibly because of the country’s role in tackling the pandemic, but reportedly also to ensure that Africa is not left out. The four extra leaders are:

Narendra Modi (India – participating virtually)

Scott Morrison (Australia)

Moon Jae-in (South Korea)

Cyril Ramaphosa (South Africa)

Updated

This morning Boris Johnson tweeted a link to an article setting out his ambitions for the G7 summit. In it, he says he wants the G7 countries to commit to providing 1bn doses of vaccine to developing countries by the end of next year. He says:

Britain has contributed £548m to Covax and we will also donate the vast majority of any surplus doses from our domestic vaccination programme.

But in the heat of emergency, we must all strive even harder. So I want the G7 to adopt an exacting yet profoundly necessary target: to provide one billion doses to developing countries in order to vaccinate everyone in the world by the end of next year.

With Joe Biden announcing a 500m-dose donation last night, and the UK announcing a 100m-dose donation this morning (see 9.18am), Johnson is already 60% there.

He also says he wants to set up a “global pandemic radar”, and set a 100-day target for the time it will take the world to prepare vaccines and treatments for any future virus. He says:

So we need to strengthen our collective ability to prevent another pandemic and provide early warning of future threats, including by creating a network of surveillance centres – a global pandemic radar.

Our scientists took just 300 days to crack Covid and produce the vaccines, but we need to be able to respond even more rapidly. This G7 summit will begin a new effort to accelerate the development of vaccines, treatments and tests for any new virus from 300 to 100 days.

At this @G7 Summit Britain will work alongside our kindred democracies to #BuildBackBetter

My article: https://t.co/UysFJPAeJB #G7UK pic.twitter.com/hklqbUxo5X

— Boris Johnson (@BorisJohnson) June 11, 2021

Updated

Johnson rejects claim offer of 100m Covid vaccine doses to poorer countries is too little

Good morning. The G7 summit in Cornwall formally opens this afternoon, and as it gets under way Boris Johnson has announced that the UK is going to donate at least 100m surplus doses of vaccine to poorer countries within the next 12 months. The news follows President Biden’s announcement yesterday that the US is buying 500m doses of the Pfizer vaccine to distribute to nearly 100 countries around the world. Here are details of the UK offer from the government news release.

The UK will donate 5m doses by the end of September, beginning in the coming weeks, primarily for use in the world’s poorest countries. The prime minister has also committed to donating a further 95m doses within the next year, including 25m more by the end of 2021. 80% of the 100m doses will go to Covax and the remainder will be shared bilaterally with countries in need.

By sharing 5m doses in the coming weeks the UK will meet an immediate demand for vaccines for the countries worst affected by coronavirus without delaying completion of our initial domestic vaccination programme

The all-party parliamentary group on coronavirus has said that this does not go far enough. Its chair, the Liberal Democrat MP Layla Moran, said:

This is an important step forward, but it does not reflect the moral urgency of the situation we face.

There is an urgent need to get jabs in arms now, to save millions of lives around the world and prevent the emergence of even deadlier and more transmissible variants.

The UK government must immediately commit to donating one vaccine dose to Covax for each one imported into the UK. Unless a continued and steady supply of vaccines is provided to those countries who desperately need them, a vital opportunity to keep this global pandemic under control will be missed.

But Johnson has dismissed this criticism. In an interview with the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg, when it was put to him that over the next three months the UK will only be donating 5m doses and that he was “talking big” but not delivering on this, he did not accept this. Johnson argued that the government’s backing for the development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine was by itself a massive contribution to the global vaccination effort, because this vaccine is being so widely used. He said:

I think that the people of this country should be very proud that of the 1.5bn doses that are being distributed around the world to the poorest and neediest in the world under the Covax programme, one in three come from the Oxford/AstraZeneca deal that the UK did, allowing those vaccines to be distributed at cost.

And that’s before we’ve talked about the £548 million that we’ve contributed to Covax, £1.6 billion to Gavi. And, yes, we’re putting in 5m doses by September, but we’ll do another, we’ll do 100m before 12 months is out. That’s a huge number of extra doses.

Here is the agenda for the day.

Morning: G7 leaders and other invitees arrive by air at Newquay.

2pm: Boris Johnson welcomes the leaders at the official opening of the summit at Carbis Bay. At 2.30pm there will be a family photograph on the beach.

Afternoon: The first session of the summit is devoted to building back after Covid.

Evening: The leaders are having dinner at the Eden Project, where they will be joined by the Queen.

During the day Johnson also has a series of bilateral meetings, including with the Japanese PM, Yoshihide Suga, the Canadian PM, Justin Trudeau, and the Italian PM, Mario Draghi.

Today I will just be focusing on the G7. For other Covid developments, do follow our global live blog.

I try to monitor the comments below the line (BTL) but it is impossible to read them all. If you have a direct question, do include “Andrew” in it somewhere and I’m more likely to find it. I do try to answer questions, and if they are of general interest, I will post the question and reply above the line (ATL), although I can’t promise to do this for everyone.

If you want to attract my attention quickly, it is probably better to use Twitter. I’m on @AndrewSparrow.

Alternatively, you can email me at andrew.sparrow@theguardian.com.

Updated

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