World of Twist: Quality Street: Expanded Edition – review

(3 Loop)

"We spent £250,000 making an album with the smallest bollocks in pop history," former World of Twist frontman Tony Ogden told the Guardian in 2005, talking about the production values that marred one of the early 90s' most anticipated albums, effectively scuppering their career. It could have been so different. Much beloved of the music press and the young Gallaghers, World of Twist were 1990s Manchester's Roxy Music: a pop/avant garde Pandora's box of Northern soul basslines, squelching electronics, scuttling dance grooves and dazzling, psychedelic live shows. Twenty years on, this remastered album (with added Peel sessions and extras) at last gives Quality Street the cojones Ogden wanted. Speed Wine is heady and blissful. The Storm and their delirious version of the Stones' She's a Rainbow find the singer as pied piper, dancing his way into an alternative pop universe. Sons of the Stage's enormous explosion of groove, colour, "noise and confusion" still sounds like the whopping, classic hit they should have had. Ogden died in 2006, but his band's timeless music is ripe for rediscovery. 

Contributor

Dave Simpson

The GuardianTramp

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