Torres: Torres – review

(Self-released)

Not to be confused with Chelsea's Spanish striker, this Torres is 22-year-old, Nashville-based Mackenzie Scott, who sings startlingly intimate confessionals about need, longing, jealousy and isolation. Her debut album was recorded live to tape, often featuring just voice and echoey guitar, though a minimalist band occasionally fleshes out her stark but sublime songs. The haunting Honey first caused internet listeners' ears to prick up with words that may or may not be about domestic violence: "Everything hurts, but it's fine … it happens all the time." Comparisons to PJ Harvey, or even Sylvia Plath, would be apt; she has a similar way of pulling back the veneer of human relationships to explore the mess beneath. Moon & Back is a touching musical letter from a mother to a child she had to give up, while Waterfall finds her pondering how "The rocks beneath bare their teeth/ They all conspire to set me free." This sounds like it could be the first flowering of a major talent.

Contributor

Dave Simpson

The GuardianTramp

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