Pop DVD: Sum 41 Live in Tokyo

(Universal)

The Clash were criticised for their inability to sustain the momentum of their opening few songs. Here at least Sum 41 are beyond reproach; whatever you make of their ugly, futile blare, they know how to keep it coming. Only when they are eight songs into this concert do they slow down - for one verse.

Singer Deryck "Bizzy D" Whibley even screams when he's introducing the next song. The rest of the time he swears, spits, gives the audience the middle finger and plays bad blues-metal guitar with his teeth. This is banal pop-punk at its most petulant: there's no excuse for buying it unless you still use acne lotion, live with your parents and really want to get on their nerves.

Contributor

James Griffiths

The GuardianTramp

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