Rubber – review

A spare tyre takes on a malevolent life of its own in Quentin Dupieux's homage to 50s low-budget horror, writes Philip French

The versatile and eccentric French film-maker Quentin Dupieux wrote, photographed, edited and directed this deadpan comedy, a parody of low-budget American horror films of the 1950s and 60s, and it was shot in English on location in California's Joshua Tree national park. In The Blob (1958) an ever-expanding ball of jelly terrorises a small town. In The Car (1977) a diabolically possessed automobile does the same thing. In Rubber a spare tyre abandoned in the desert takes on an increasingly malevolent life of its own. Dupieux kicks off the picture by bringing in a local sheriff to inform a bizarre middle American audience that what they're about to see is a homage to the "no reason" movie, and then he gives them binoculars to watch the tyre from a distance and comment on its actions. It's arch, quirky stuff and, approached in the right spirit, rather entertaining.

Contributor

Philip French

The GuardianTramp

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