How did this woman enrage the king? Take the great British art quiz

Museums across the UK may be closed due to coronavirus, but you can still explore their art collections thanks to our fun daily quiz. Today it’s set by Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire

This quiz is brought to you in collaboration with Art UK, the online home for the UK’s public art collections, showing art from more than 3,000 venues and by 45,000 artists. Each day, a different collection on Art UK will set the questions.

Today, the questions are set by Waddesdon Manor. The manor was designed by Gabriel-Hippolyte Destailleur in the style of a French Renaissance chateau. Built for Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild (1839–1898), today it houses several important collections of paintings. They include the highest quality 18th-century English and European paintings and decorative arts.

You can see art from Waddesdon Manor on Art UK here. Find out more on the Waddeson Manor website here.

  1. Waddesdon Manor.
‘Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild (1839–1898)’, c.1880, British (English) School, National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    Baron Ferdinand, the builder of Waddesdon, was born in Paris, but always intended to settle in Britain. In what year did he buy the Waddesdon Estate?

    1. 1600

    2. 1784

    3. 1874

    4. 1957

  2. Waddesdon Manor. 
‘The Pink Boy (possibly Francis Nicholls, b.1774)’, 1782, Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    The Pink Boy (possibly Francis Nicholls), painted in 1782, is one of Thomas Gainsborough’s most famous portraits of children, one of several he painted in so-called Van Dyck costume. How many paintings by Gainsborough can be seen at Waddesdon?

    1. 25

    2. Four

    3. 12

    4. Nine

  3. Waddesdon Manor. Martine-Gabrielle-Yoland de Polastron (1745–1793), Duchesse de Polignac’, 1783, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (1755–1842), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    Who painted this 1783 portrait of Queen Marie-Antoinette’s great friend, the Duchesse de Polignac?

    1. Thomas Gainsborough

    2. Antoine-François Callet

    3. Elisabeth-Louise Vigée LeBrun

    4. François Boucher

  4. Waddesdon Manor. Overdoor with a Spaniel, Parrot, Flowers and Fruit’, c.1730–1750, attributed to the Flemish School, National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    What breed of dog is shown barking at a parrot in this painting, probably made in the mid-18th century in either France or Flanders?

    1. Springer Spaniel

    2. Cocker Spaniel

    3. Cockerpoo

    4. King Charles Spaniel

  5. Waddesdon Manor. Lady Anne Luttrell (1743–1809), Duchess of Cumberland’, 1772–1773, Joshua Reynolds (1723–1792), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    Painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1772-3, this woman’s marriage led George III to propose the Royal Marriages Act. Who is she?

    1. Lady Anne Luttrell

    2. Lady Sheffield

    3. Nell Gwynn

    4. Emma Hamilton

  6. Waddesdon Manor. Amsterdam, Houses on the Herengracht’, c.1670–1690, Jan van der Heyden (1637–1712), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    Which Dutch city is seen in this reflective 17th-century cityscape by Jan van der Heyden?

    1. Delft

    2. Amsterdam

    3. Leiden

    4. The Hague

  7. Waddesdon Manor. Sleeping Beauty: The Princess Pricks Her Finger on a Spinning Wheel’, 1913–1922, Léon Bakst (1866–1924), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    Which fairytale was the inspiration for this scene, one of a set of seven panels by the Russian artist Léon Bakst?

    1. Rapunzel

    2. Cinderella

    3. Sleeping Beauty

    4. Frozen

  8. Waddesdon Manor. The Lawn at Goodwood’, c.1886, Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor

    What sort of summer society event does this giant canvas depict, with the future King Edward VII and members of the Rothschild family in attendance?

    1. A polo match

    2. A race meeting

    3. A Buckingham Palace garden party

    4. Wimbledon

Solutions

1:C - Baron Ferdinand bought the Waddesdon Estate from the Duke of Marlborough in 1874, choosing Buckinghamshire because of “its pleasant, salubrious air” and proximity to London. He wanted a house where he could entertain friends and family and display his outstanding collection of art. During Ferdinand’s lifetime, it was used for summer "Saturday to Monday" house parties, which were legendary for their luxury and hospitality. Guests included Queen Victoria, the Prince of Wales, politicians and literary and artistic figures. Image: Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild (1839–1898), c.1880, British (English) School, National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 2:D - English 18th-century portraiture was a Rothschild family passion – their activities transformed the market in this field from the mid-19th century. Ferdinand assembled an important collection at Waddesdon and in his London house, including three boys in Van Dyck dress. Dressing up in 17th-century costume was popular from the 1730s for masquerades and portraits. Gainsborough was said to have kept one in his studio for the purpose. Image: The Pink Boy (possibly Francis Nicholls, b.1774), 1782, Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 3:C - Martine-Gabrielle-Yoland de Polastron (1745–1793) is captured singing, by a piano with sheet music in her hand. One of the Queen’s closest friends, she was governess to the royal children. The artist, also part of the royal circle, painted her in the fashionably informal dress popularised by Marie-Antoinette. Vigée Le Brun was one of only 15 women admitted to the prestigious French Académie Royale, entering in 1783, the year this portrait was painted. Image: Martine-Gabrielle-Yoland de Polastron (1745–1793), Duchesse de Polignac, 1783, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (1755–1842), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 4:D - The slanted corners of this canvas, one of three with similar subjects, indicate that it is an overdoor, made to be set into panelling. The dog is probably a type of King Charles Spaniel, a breed which became fashionable in the 17th century at the courts of Charles I and II. This rich chestnut and white variety was called a Blenheim, after the first Duke of Marlborough, who first bred them. Image: Overdoor with a Spaniel, Parrot, Flowers and Fruit, c.1730–1750, attributed to the Flemish School, National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 5:A - Lady Anne, a young widow, scandalously eloped with the King’s brother, the Duke of Cumberland, enraging the King who introduced legislation requiring the royal family to seek the monarch’s approval before marrying, still in place today. The antiquarian and politician Horace Walpole said she was "as artful as Cleopatra" with "the most amorous eyes in the world, and eyelashes a yard long". She never paid for her portrait, which was still in Reynold’s studio when he died. Image: Lady Anne Luttrell (1743–1809), Duchess of Cumberland, 1772–1773, Joshua Reynolds (1723–1792), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 6:B - Made between 1670 and 1690, this painting depicts the Herengracht, one of the four major concentric canals that ring the centre of Amsterdam. It is still a recognisable scene – house numbers 168 and 170-171 are visible. Van der Heyden was working in Amsterdam from around 1660, and lived in a house on this street. Netherlandish painting was much admired by the Rothschild family and this is one of a significant group at Waddesdon. Image: Amsterdam, Houses on the Herengracht, c.1670–1690, Jan van der Heyden (1637–1712), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 7:C - Bakst (1866–1924) is best known as a stage designer, who helped found the Ballet Russes. He was commissioned by James de Rothschild in 1913 to paint a set of panels illustrating the Sleeping Beauty for his London house, using family members, their staff and family pets as models. It took nine years to complete, delayed by other projects and the outbreak of the first world war, much to James’s frustration. Image: Sleeping Beauty: The Princess Pricks Her Finger on a Spinning Wheel, 1913–1922, Léon Bakst (1866–1924), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 8:B - The Lawn at Goodwood was painted around 1886 by Lowes Cato Dickinson, an artist specialising in giant, detailed canvases of large gatherings. Their real purpose was portraiture, and the only hint that this is a race meeting is the shadows of horses and jockeys in the foreground. Many people from the Rothschild’s circle are depicted, several of whom visited Waddesdon, including the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII). Image: The Lawn at Goodwood, c.1886, Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819- 1908), National Trust, Waddesdon Manor, 9:, 10:

Scores

  1. 7 and above.

    A triumph – raise a lockdown toast to yourself.

  2. 4 and above.

    Not amazing but definitely half-decent.

  3. 0 and above.

    An inglorious outcome.

The GuardianTramp

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