Tiger Stadium

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Tiger Stadium
"The Corner"[1]
Inside Tiger Stadium, Detroit.jpg
Tiger Stadium in 1998
Former namesNavin Field (1912–37)[7][2]
Briggs Stadium (1938–60)[7][11]
Address2121 Trumbull Avenue[2]
LocationDetroit, Michigan[2]
Coordinates42°19′55″N 83°4′8″W / 42.33194°N 83.06889°W / 42.33194; -83.06889Coordinates: 42°19′55″N 83°4′8″W / 42.33194°N 83.06889°W / 42.33194; -83.06889
OwnerDetroit Tigers (1912–77)[6]
City of Detroit (1977–2009)[6]
OperatorDetroit Tigers[7][2]
Capacity23,000 (1912)[3]
30,000 (1923)[3]
52,416 (1937)[3]
Field sizeLeft field – 340 ft (104 m)[2]
Left-center field – 365 ft (111 m)[2]
Center field – 440 ft (134 m)[2]
Right-center field – 370 ft (113 m)[2]
Right field – 325 ft (99 m)[2]
Backstop – 66 ft (20 m)[3]
SurfaceBluegrass[3]
Construction
Broke groundOctober 1911[2]
OpenedApril 20, 1912[2]
ClosedJuly 24, 2001[3]
DemolishedJune 30, 2008 (began)[4]
September 21, 2009 (completed)[5]
Construction costUS$300,000[8]
($7.95 million in 2019 dollars[9])
ArchitectOsborn Engineering Company[7][2]
General contractorHunkin & Conkey[10]
Tenants
Detroit Tigers (MLB) (1912–1999)
Detroit Heralds (OL) (1912–1919)
Detroit Heralds/Tigers (APFA) (1920–1921)
Detroit Panthers (NFL) (1925–1926)
Detroit Lions (NFL) (1938–1939, 1941–1974)
Detroit Cougars (NPSL / NASL) (1967–1968)
Tiger Stadium
NRHP reference No.88003236[12]
Added to NRHPFebruary 6, 1989

Tiger Stadium, previously known as Navin Field and Briggs Stadium, was a baseball park located in the Corktown neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan. It hosted the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball from 1912 to 1999, as well as the Detroit Lions of the National Football League from 1938 to 1974. It was declared a State of Michigan Historic Site in 1975 and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1989. The stadium was nicknamed "The Corner" for its location on Michigan Avenue and Trumbull Avenue.

The last Tigers game at the stadium was held on September 27, 1999. In the decade after the Tigers vacated the stadium, several rejected redevelopment and preservation efforts finally gave way to demolition. The stadium's demolition was completed on September 21, 2009, though the stadium's actual playing field remains at the corner where the stadium stood.

In 2018, the site was redeveloped for youth sports.[13]

  1. ^ Mesrey, Dave (September 27, 2014). "Remembering 'The Corner'". Detroit Metro Times. Retrieved June 17, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Ferkovich, Scott. "Tiger Stadium (Detroit)". Society of American Baseball Research. Retrieved June 17, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Tiger Stadium". Ballparks.com. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  4. ^ "Tiger Stadium still holds a special place in hearts of fans". Toledo Blade. July 6, 2018. Retrieved June 17, 2019.
  5. ^ Oosting, Jonathan (September 22, 2009). "Sept. 21, 2009: The day Tiger Stadium died". MLive. Retrieved June 17, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Tiger Stadium". Detroit Historical Society. Retrieved June 17, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d "Ballparks". Tigers.com. Retrieved June 13, 2019.
  8. ^ Shea, Bill (September 10, 2017). "What Detroit's stadiums cost". Crain's Detroit Business. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  9. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  10. ^ "Bennett Park/Navin Field/Briggs Stadium/Tiger Stadium". Detroit1701. Retrieved May 10, 2014.
  11. ^ Dow, Bill (March 6, 2011). "50 Years ago Briggs Stadium was Renamed Tiger Stadium". Vintage Detroit. Retrieved February 29, 2020.
  12. ^ "National Register of Historic Places – MICHIGAN (MI), Wayne Country". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  13. ^ Dudar, Hasan (March 24, 2018). "First pitch thrown at former Tiger Stadium site, now home to youth league". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved June 13, 2019.

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