Riverfront Stadium

Architectural structure

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Riverfront Stadium
"The Home of the Big Red Machine"
"The Jungle"
Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio.jpg
The Stadium seen from above in 1980
Former namesRiverfront Stadium (1970–96)
Cinergy Field (1996–2002)
Location201 East Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati 45202
Coordinates39°5′48″N 84°30′30″W / 39.09667°N 84.50833°W / 39.09667; -84.50833Coordinates: 39°5′48″N 84°30′30″W / 39.09667°N 84.50833°W / 39.09667; -84.50833
OwnerCity of Cincinnati
Capacity52,952 (baseball, 1970–2000)
59,754 (football)
39,000 (baseball, 2001–02)
Field size1970–2000
Left field – 330 ft (100 m)
Left-center field – 375 ft (114 m)
Center field – 404 ft (123 m)
Right-center field – 375 ft (114 m)
Right field – 330 ft (100 m)
Backstop – 51 ft (16 m)

2001–2002
Left field – 325 ft (99 m)
Left-center field – 370 ft (110 m)
Center field – 393 ft (120 m)
Right-center field – 373 ft (114 m)
Right field – 325 ft (99 m)
Backstop – 41 ft (12 m)
SurfaceAstroTurf 8 (1970–2000)
Grass (2001–2002)
Construction
Broke groundFebruary 1, 1968
OpenedJune 30, 1970
ClosedSeptember 22, 2002
DemolishedDecember 29, 2002
Construction costUS$45 million
($296 million in 2019 dollars[3])
ArchitectHeery & Heery
FABRAP
Structural engineerPrybylowski and Gravino, Inc.[1]
General contractorHuber, Hunt & Nichols[2]
Tenants
Cincinnati Bengals (NFL) (1970–1999)
Cincinnati Reds (MLB) (1970–2002)
Cincinnati Bearcats (NCAA) (1990)

Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999. Located on the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, the stadium was best known as the home of "The Big Red Machine", as the Reds were often called in the 1970s.

Construction began on February 1, 1968, and was completed at a cost of less than $50 million. On June 30, 1970, the Reds hosted the Atlanta Braves in their grand opening, with Hank Aaron hitting the first ever home run at Riverfront. Two weeks later on July 14, 1970, Riverfront hosted the 1970 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. This game is best remembered for the often-replayed collision at home plate between Reds star Pete Rose and catcher Ray Fosse of the Cleveland Indians.

In September 1996, Riverfront Stadium was renamed "Cinergy Field" in a sponsorship deal with Greater Cincinnati energy company Cinergy. In 2001, to make room for Great American Ball Park, the seating capacity at Cinergy Field was reduced to 39,000. There was a huge in-play wall in center field visible after the renovations, to serve as the batter's eye. The stadium was demolished by implosion on December 29, 2002.

  1. ^ "Cincinnati Riverfront Stadium". Architectural Record. Record and Guide. 147: 54. 1970.
  2. ^ [citation needed]
  3. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved January 1, 2020.

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