Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras World Heritage Site

Various rice terraces located at the Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines

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Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Batad Rice Terraces, Ifugao Province, Philippines.jpg
Batad Rice Terraces, Ifugao Province, Philippines
LocationIfugao, Cordillera Administrative Region, Luzon, Philippines
Includes
CriteriaCultural: (iii)(iv)(v)
Reference722
Inscription1995 (19th session)
Endangered2001–2012[1]
Coordinates16°56′2″N 121°8′12″E / 16.93389°N 121.13667°E / 16.93389; 121.13667Coordinates: 16°56′2″N 121°8′12″E / 16.93389°N 121.13667°E / 16.93389; 121.13667
Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras is located in Luzon
Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras
Location of Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras in Luzon
Show map of Luzon
Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras is located in Philippines
Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras
Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras (Philippines)
Show map of Philippines
Nagacadan Rice Terraces
Batad Rice Terraces close-up view
View of the rice terraces
A village in the Batad rice terraces
Rice Terraces of Batad
Bayyo Village with their rice terraces
Scenery of Fidelisan while trekking

The Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras (Filipino: Mga Hagdan-Hagdang Palayan ng Kordilyera ng Pilipinas; Ifugao: Payyo) were inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1995, the first-ever property to be included in the cultural landscape category of the World Heritage List.[2] This inscription has five sites: the Batad Rice Terraces, Bangaan Rice Terraces (both in Banaue), Mayoyao Rice Terraces (in Mayoyao), Hungduan Rice Terraces (in Hungduan) and Nagacadan Rice Terraces (in Kiangan), all in Ifugao Province, Philippines. The Ifugao Rice Terraces reach a higher altitude and were built on steeper slopes than many other terraces. The Ifugao complex of stone or mud walls and the careful carving of the natural contours of hills and mountains to make terraced pond fields, coupled with the development of intricate irrigation systems, harvesting water from the forests of the mountain tops, and an elaborate farming system.

The Ifugao Rice Terraces illustrate the remarkable ability of human culture to adapt to new social and climate pressures as well as to implement and develop new ideas and technologies. Although listed by the UNESCO as a World Heritage site believed to be older than 2,000 years, recent studies from Ifugao Archaeological Project[3] report that they were actually constructed upon Spanish contact about 400 years ago.[4][5][6][7][8]

Maintenance of the living rice terraces reflects a primarily cooperative approach of the whole community which is based on detailed knowledge of the rich diversity of biological resources existing in the Ifugao agro-ecosystem, a finely tuned annual system respecting lunar cycles, zoning and planning, extensive soil conservation, and mastery of a complex pest control regime based on the processing of a variety of herbs, accompanied by religious rituals.

  1. ^ Better conservation in Pakistan and the Philippines allow Committee to remove two sites from World Heritage List in Danger at UNESCO website
  2. ^ Malig, Jojo (26 June 2012). "Philippine rice terraces no longer in danger". ABS-CBN News. Retrieved 26 June 2012.
  3. ^ "Ifugao Archeological Project".
  4. ^ Cabreza, Vincent (July 15, 2013). "For Ifugao rice terraces, age should not matter". Inquirer.net. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Ifugao Rice Terraces may be younger than we think". Rappler. April 29, 2015. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  6. ^ Acabado, Stephen B.; Koller, Jared M.; Liu, Chin-hsin; Lauer, Adam J.; Farahani, Alan; Barretto-Tesoro, Grace; Reyes, Marian C; Martin, Jonathan Albert; Peterson, John A. (2019). "The Short History of the Ifugao Rice Terraces: A Local Response to the Spanish Conquest". Journal of Field Archaeology. 44 (3): 195–214 – via Taylor & Francis Online. Cite has empty unknown parameters: |author-separator= and |separator= (help)
  7. ^ Acabado, Stephen (2018). "Zones of refuge: Resisting conquest in the northern Philippine highlands through environmental practice". Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. 52: 180–195 – via Elsevier Science Direct.
  8. ^ Acabado, Stephen B. (2015). Antiquity, archaeological processes, and highland adaptation: The Ifugao rice terraces. Loyola Heights, Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

Nearby Places

  • Banaue Rice Terraces
  • Banaue

    Municipality in Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines

  • Mayoyao

    Municipality in Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines

  • Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras

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